This Week At The Classical Station

Church and Autumn Leaves in Stowe, Vermont by Patrick Breen on Wikimedia Commons

This Week At The Classical Station

by Rob Kennedy

Sunday, October 4, 2020

This evening on Preview! violinist Jerilyn Jorgensen and pianist Cullan Bryant play Beethoven on historic instruments. Rob Kennedy speaks with North Carolina composer Caroline Shaw about her new recording with the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra. And baritone Nikolay Borchev sings Schubert, with pianist Wu Han.

Preview! brings you the best in new classical recordings each Sunday from 6 to 9 p.m. Eastern Time. Steve Thebes hosts.

Photo: Caroline Shaw/Kait Moreno

This evening on Wavelengths we’ll turn to a 20th-century work for guitar and orchestra by Mexican composer Manuel Ponce. We’ll also hear a 2016 composition for bass clarinet and marimba by Jonathan Bailey Holland, and music for cello and orchestra by Anna Clyne.

Wavelengths brings you the best in contemporary classical music, Sundays at 9 p.m. Eastern. Ed Amend hosts.

Photo: Caroline Shaw/Kait Moreno

This morning Great Sacred Music includes music sung by Gloriae Dei Cantores, the Utah State University Chamber Singers, and the Choir of St. Catherine’s College, Cambridge. Dr. John Shelton Reed offers a commentary on St. Catherine’s College. Thomas Brown, retired Organist of University Presbyterian Church in Chapel Hill, plays Vierne on the Quimby organ in St. Michael’s Episcopal Church, Litchfield, Connecticut. Also on the playlist is choral music by Johann Sebastian Bach, Morten Lauridsen, and George Frideric Handel’s first oratorio, Esther.

The first Sunday of our Fall Membership Drive, October 25,  features an All-Request Great Sacred Music.  Send your requests no later than October 16 to Rob Kennedy whose email address is sacred@theclassicalstation.org

Great Sacred Music. Beautiful choral and organ music. Every Sunday morning. 8 a.m. eastern. Right after Sing For Joy. With Rob Kennedy.

Photo: 1992 Quimby organ in St. Michael’s Episcopal Church, Litchfield, Connecticut/The Register Journal

On October 4 we observe the birthday of German composer August Wilhelm Bach (1796-1869). While not a member of the famous Bach family, Herr Bach made his living as a composer, teacher, and organist. He wrote sacred choral and organ music as well as teaching at the Royal Institute of Church Music in Berlin.

Photo: Wikipedia.org


Saturday, October 3, 2020

On October 3 we observe the birthdays of English pianist and composer Cipriani Potter (1792-1871) and Polish-American conductor Stanisław Skrowaczewski (1923-2013). A brilliant pianist, Philip Cipriani Hambly Potter premiered several Mozart and Beethoven concerti in London. He also gave the first performance there of Brahms’ A German Requiem. Maestro Skrowaczewski was the music director of the Minnesota Orchestra from 1960-1979. He guest-conducted many of the world’s orchestras during his long career.

Photos: Wikipedia.org


Friday, October 2, 2020

On October 2 we observe the birthdays of English composers Kenneth Leighton (1929-1988) and Dr. Francis Jackson (1917-), and French conductor Michel Plasson (1933-). A Professor of Music at the University of Edinburgh, Kenneth Leighton composed over 100 works during his lifetime. Francis Jackson celebrates his 103rd birthday today! He was Organist of York Minster from 1946-1982. Highly respected for his interpretations of music by Gounod and Massenet, Monsieur Plasson is widely considered one of the great conductors of his generation. Joyeux quatre-vingt-septième anniversaire, Maître!

Photos: Wikipedia.org


Thursday, October 1, 2020

This evening the Thursday Night Opera House presents Richard Strauss’ Der Rosenkavalier (The Knight of the Rose). This comic opera involves the aristocratic Marschallin (Te Kanawa), her lover Octavian (Von Otter), her cousin Baron Ochs (Rydl), and Sophie (Hendricks).

The curtain goes up at 7 p.m. Eastern. Bob Chapman hosts.

Photo: Scene from the 2016 Metropolitan Opera production of Der Rosenkavalier/Ken Howard

On October 1 we observe the birthdays of Italian composer Alessandro Stradella (1639-1682), French composer Paul Dukas (1865-1935), and Russian pianist Vladimir Horowitz (1903-1989). Signor Stradella composed over 300 works in a variety of styles. Unfortunately, his philandering lifestyle led to his untimely demise. Monsieur Dukas is perhaps best known for The Sorcerer’s Apprentice. He taught at the Paris Conservatoire and was also a music critic. Vladimir Samoylovich Horowitz married conductor Arturo Toscanini’s daughter Wanda. Horowitz is widely considered one of the greatest pianists of the 20th century.

Photos: Wikipedia.org


Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Can you be an angel? We need angels for our Fall 2020 Membership Drive which will begin in a few weeks. The point of our membership drives is to encourage listeners to become supporting members of The Classical Station. Did you know that Angels help us achieve that objective? Well, yes, they do and have done so for many years. Our Angels are amazing listeners who will match your gift to encourage you to support this unique classical music radio station that you enjoy so much.

The way it works is very simple. For example, a listener in Charlotte, North Carolina, commits $600 to the membership drive. She tells us that she will match 5 contributions of $10 per month. So, once her angel match is met and 5 new members have become Sustaining Members at $10 per month, The Classical Station garners $600 from our Angel and another $600 from the 5 listeners who have become Sustaining Members at the $10 per month level.

Can you be an Angel during our Fall 2020 Membership Drive? Here’s how to make that happen: call us anytime and tell the member of staff who answers that you want to be an Angel with your gift of $300 or more. 800-556-5178.

You can also become an Angel by making your gift of $300 or more online via our secure server. Put “This is an Angel Match!” in the Comments Box.  Your Angel Match can be paid as a Sustaining Membership. So, a $300 Angel Match can be spread across 12 months with a monthly payment of $25.

Remember: you can call the station anytime. 24/7. A live member of staff will take your call and help you with your pledge and any questions you have. Thank you for being an Angel and encouraging other listeners to support The Classical Station!

On September 30 we observe the birthdays of Norwegian composer Johan Svendsen (1840-1911), Czech conductor Václav Smetáček (1906-1986), Irish composer Sir Charles Stanford (1852-1924), and Soviet violinist David Oistrakh (1908-1974). Johan Svendsen wrote several symphonies and string quartets. Maestro Smetáček conducted the Prague Symphony Orchestra. Stanford was one of the first professors on the staff of the Royal College of Music. David Oistrakh was one of the 20th century’s foremost violinists.

Photos: Wikipedia.org


Tuesday, September 29, 2020

On September 29 we observe the birthdays of German composers Vincent Lubeck (1654-1740) and Johann Gottlieb Schicht (1753-1823), Czech conductor Vaclav Neumann (1920-1995), and Australian conductor Richard Bonynge (1930-). Herr Lubeck was one of the foremost organists of his time. Herr Schicht was cantor of the Thomanchor, the same position held by Johann Sebastian Bach a century before. Maestro Neumann was music director of the Czech Philharmonic from 1968-1990. Maestro Bonynge is the widower of Dame Joan Sutherland. He conducted virtually all of his wife’s performances.

Photo: Wikipedia.org


Monday, September 28, 2020

This evening Monday Night at the Symphony features the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, based in New York City. On the program is music by Antonio Vivaldi, Ottorino Respighi, Pyotr Tchaikovsky, and Josef Haydn. The concert begins at 8 p.m. Eastern.

Photo: Matt Dine

On September 28 we observe the birthday of Russian violinist Alina Ibragimova (1985-). Ms. Ibragimova was born in Russia. She has lived in England since her father took a position with the London Symphony Orchestra. She studied at the Royal College of Music. Since then she has appeared with orchestras worldwide.

Photo: Pymouss on Wikimedia Commons