This Week At The Classical Station

Photo of North Carolina Outer Banks by Ken Lund

Sunday, April 19, 2020

This week on Preview! Thierry Fischer leads the Utah Symphony in music of Berlioz.  Rob Kennedy speaks with Chinese pianist Wei Luo about her career and studies at the Curtis Institute. Clarinetist Pierre Gennison plays Copland and pianist Vikingur Olafsson plays works by Debussy and Rameau. See What’s Playing for a detailed playlist.

Preview! – the best in new classical recordings and arts news each Sunday from 6 to 9 p.m. Eastern.

Photo: Thierry Fischer/Wikipedia.org

This week on WAVELengths we’ll hear music by acclaimed North Carolina composer Jack Jarrett, who formerly chaired the composition department at the Berklee School of Music in Boston. We’ll also hear works by Dobrinka Tabakova and Peter Boyer. See What’s Playing for a detailed playlist.

WAVElengths brings you the best in contemporary classical music Sunday evenings at 9 p.m. Eastern.

Photo: Jack Jarrett/Wikipedia.org

This week Great Sacred Music includes music sung by the Choir of St. Paul’s Cathedral, London, Monks of the Monastery of Christ in the Desert, and the La Capella Ducale. Also on the playlist is choral music by Johann Sebastian Bach, Josef Haydn, and George Frederic Handel. What’s Playing has a detailed playlist.

Great Sacred Music. Beautiful choral and organ music for your Sunday morning. Right after Sing For Joy. From 8 a.m. until noon Eastern. With Rob Kennedy.

Window in St. Leon Church, Westmount, Quebec/Wikipedia.org

On April 19 we observe the birthdays of French composer Germaine Tailleferre (1892-1983), French conductor and violinist Yan Pascal Tortelier (1947-), and American pianist Murray Perahia (1947-). Over the course of her long life, Germaine Tailleferre wrote a variety of compositions including television and film scores. Son of cellist Paul Tortelier, Monsieur Tortelier records for the Chandos label. A native of New York, Murray Perahia is considered one of the great pianists of the late 20th and 21st centuries.

Photos: Wikipedia.org

Saturday, April 18, 2020

What would you like us to play for you this evening? The Saturday Evening Request Program is our ever-popular weekly request program. It’s six hours of music you have chosen. Click Music Request and let us know what you want us to play. Short works? Yes. Long works? Yes. You are the Music Director for Saturday evening. The program usually is over-subscribed by 2 p.m. on Saturday, so get your request in as soon as you can.

You may call 919-556-0123 after 7 a.m. Eastern and tell the announcer what you would like to hear. Then, after 6 p.m., check What’s Playing to see when your request will be played.

Today the Metropolitan Opera will rebroadcast a 2011 performance of Giuseppe Verdi’s Simon Boccanegra, a compelling portrayal of a man who is both a leader and an outsider in one of the most incisive depictions of politics ever put on the stage. Dmitri Hvorostovsky sings the title role and Barbara Frittoli is his long-lost daughter Amelia Grimaldi. Heard in other principal roles are Ramón Vargas (Gabriele Adorno), Nicola Alaimo (Paolo), and Ferruccio Furlanetto (Jacopo Fiesco). James Levine conducts.

Simon Boccanegra will be heard on The Classical Station at 1:00 p.m. Eastern on Saturday, April 18. Listen on 89.7 FM in Central North Carolina, online or on our apps. Tell your smart speaker to “play the Classical Station.”

Scene from the 2018 production of Simon Boccanegra/Ken Howard, Metropolitan Opera

On April 18 we observe the birthdays of Austrian composer Franz von Suppé (1819-1895), British conductor Leopold Stokowski (1882-1977), and French organist Jean Guillou (1930-2019). Christened Francesco Ezechiele Ermenegildo Cavaliere di Suppé-Demelli, Herr von Suppé is known to modern audiences for his operettas and their rousing overtures. Maestro Stokowski was one of the 20th-century’s greatest conductors. He began his musical career as an organist and went on to be Music Director of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the NBC Symphony Orchestra, New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, and the Houston Symphony Orchestra, among others. Monsieur Guillou was Titular Organist of Eglise St. Eustache in Paris for 52 years.

Photos: Wikipedia.org

Friday, April 17, 2020

What would you like us to play for you today? It’s All Request Friday. It’s a day filled with music you have chosen. Click Music Request and let us know what you want us to play. Short works? Yes. Long works? Yes. You are the Music Director today! The program usually is over-subscribed by noon, so get your request in as soon as you can.

You may call 919-556-0123 after 7 a.m. Eastern and tell Phil Davis Campbell what you would like to hear. Then, after 9 a.m., check What’s Playing to see when your request will be played.

Today we observe the birthdays of Austrian pianist Artur Schnabel (1882-1951), Russian-born American cellist Gregor Piatigorsky (1903-1976), American composer Adolphus Hailstork (1941-), and Brazilian pianist Cristina Ortiz (1950-). Herr Schnabel was the first pianist to record all thirty-two of Beethoven’s sonatas. Gregor Piatigorsky was championed by great musicians such as Wilhelm Furtwangler and Richard Strauss. Fulbright scholar Adolphus Hailstork is Professor of Music and Composer-in-Residence at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. A first-prize winner of the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, Ms. Ortiz has performed extensively with orchestras worldwide.

Photos: Wikipedia.org

Thursday, April 16, 2020

This evening on Opera House, the late Al Ruocchio (1937-2007) introduces Gioachino Rossini’s Semiramide. First performed in Venice in 1823, Semiramide was once famously called the last and most beautiful of the great baroque operas. The description is in some respects inaccurate: later Italian composers looked back to it on occasion, and Verdi’s Aida unquestionably owes something to its monumentality. Rossini’s source is a play by Voltaire that overlays the legend of Semiramide, the promiscuous queen of Babylon, with echoes of the myths of Orestes and Oedipus, together with overtones of Macbeth.

The curtain goes up at 7 p.m. Eastern. Listen on 89.7 FM in Central North Carolina, streaming everywhere on our apps and online. Tell your smart speaker to “Play The Classical Station.”

Don’t forget that we have more opera for you on Saturday. The Metropolitan Opera’s radio broadcasts continue with recorded performances of the scheduled opera. This week the Met is presenting a 2011 performance of Giuseppe Verdi’s Simon Boccanegra, a compelling portrayal of a man who is both a leader and an outsider in one of the most incisive depictions of politics ever put on the stage. Dmitri Hvorostovsky sings the title role and Barbara Frittoli is his long-lost daughter Amelia Grimaldi. Heard in other principal roles are Ramón Vargas (Gabriele Adorno), Nicola Alaimo (Paolo), and Ferruccio Furlanetto (Jacopo Fiesco). James Levine conducts. Curtain time: 1 p.m. Eastern.

Photo: Scene from the 2018 Metropolitan Opera production of Semiramide/Ken Howard

On April 16 we observe the birthdays of Catalan composer Federico Mompou (1893-1987) and American conductor Denis Russell Davies (1944-). After attending the Paris Conservatoire, Federico Mompou spent his life composing music mainly for solo piano. A Julliard graduate, Dr. Davies has conducted many of the world’s orchestras. He is noted for his advocacy of contemporary music.

Photos: Wikipedia.org

Wednesday, April 15, 2020

Have you heard the latest edition of Cadenza? In it, Nan Pincus reports on the last performance of the Orchestrette Classique. Rob Kennedy speaks with JoAnn Falletta. Dr. Haydn Jones profiles composer Clara Schumann. Nick Robinson shines his flashlight on ancient music in a tour of his Gallery of Sounds. Cellist Ofra Harnoy talks about her multi-track recording Back To BachCadenza is also available on our apps and on your favorite podcast platform.

On April 15 we observe the birthday of English conductor Sir Neville Marriner (1924-2016). One of the greatest conductors of our time, Sir Neville founded the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields in 1958. He recorded extensively with that ensemble.

Photo: Richard Holt

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

Have you discovered our Conversations With Composers? It’s fascinating listening to composers like Dan Locklair and Jennifer Higdon talking about their craft. These musicians love what they do and are most eager to share their art with everybody. Let your family and friends know about these conversations which they can listen to or download anytime. You can also enjoy these conversations on our apps and on your favorite podcast platform.

On April 14 we observe the birthdays of Finnish conductor Paavo Berglund, English cellist Julian Lloyd Webber, Russian conductor and pianist Mikhail Pletnev, and American cellist Alisa Weilerstein. Maestro Berglund was renowned for his interpretations of Jean Sibelius’ symphonies. Julian Lloyd Webber had a distinguished career as a cellist. Maestro Pletnev is the Founder and Artistic Director of the Russian National Orchestra. Alisa Weilerstein was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011.

Photo: Wikipedia.org

Monday, April 13, 2020

This evening Monday Night at the Symphony shines the spotlight on the London Symphony Orchestra. Hear music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Johannes Brahms, and Sir Edward Elgar in performances led by Neeme Järvi, Claudio Abbado, and current artistic director Sir Simon Rattle.

You can enjoy the concert beginning at 8 p.m. on 89.7 FM in Central North Carolina and streaming everywhere online and on our apps.

Photo: Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra

The April edition of Renaissance Fare features April Love and April Fools and we’ll have music for both. The program features The Feast of Fools from the New London Consort, French love songs from the Scholars of London and romantic tunes from John Rutter and the Cambridge Singers. This evening at 7 p.m. Eastern with your genial host George Douglas.

Photo: Wikipedia.org

On April 13 we observe the birthdays of English composer William Sterndale Bennett (1816-1875) and American duo-pianists John and Richard Contiguglia (1937-). William Sterndale Bennett studied in Leipzig where his compositions were admired by Feliz Mendelssohn and Robert Schumann. The Contiguglia twins are both graduates of Yale University.

Photos: Wikipedia.org