This Week at The Classical Station

Photo by Dale Marie Muller, Roberts, Montana

This Week at The Classical Station

by Rob Kennedy

Sunday, February 18, 2024

Pianist Jorge Federico Osorio opens Preview! this evening with Romanza de Amor by Manuel Ponce from his 2023 recording on the Cedille label entitled Conciertos Romanticos. German pianist Burkard Schliessemann speaks about his recording Live and Encores.

Preview! brings you the latest releases and local arts news every Sunday at 6 p.m. Eastern.

This morning, Great Sacred Music includes performances by the Morgan State University Choir, Andreas Scholl, and the Monteverdi Choir and Orchestra. On the playlist are works by Sir Charles Villiers Stanford, Orlando di Lasso, Marco Rosano and many more.

Great Sacred Music. 8 a.m. Eastern. Right after Sing for Joy. With Mick Anderson.

Today we observe the birthday of Canadian composer André Mathieu (1929-1968). Mathieu began composing at a young age and eventually went to Paris where he studied with Arthur Honegger. Mathieu’s best-known composition is the Concerto Romantique, also known as the Concerto de Québec, a work written in the grand late-Romantic style.

Photo: Orchestre symphonique de Montreal, Unknown Author, Fair Use


Saturday, February 17, 2024

The Metropolitan Opera’s 2023-24 season of Saturday matinee broadcasts continues with Un Ballo in Maschera – A Masked Ball, by Giuseppe Verdi, a highlight from the Met’s fall lineup. It stars tenor Charles Castronovo as King Gustav of Sweden, whose life is threatened by both political turmoil and a secret, illicit love. Soprano Angela Meade is the king’s beloved Amelia, and baritone Quinn Kelsey is his best friend – Amelia’s husband. The cast also features Liv Redpath and Olesya Petrova, with Carlo Rizzi conducting the Met Orchestra and Chorus in Verdi’s dynamic score.

The broadcast begins at 1 p.m. Tell your smart speaker to “Play The Classical Station.”

On February 17 we observe the birthdays of Italian composer Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713), French composer Henri Vieuxtemps (1820-1881), English composer Sir Edward German (1862-1936), American composer Lee Hoiby (1926-2011), Welsh composer Sir Karl Jenkins (1944-), and Dutch cellist Anner Bylsma (1934-2019).

Bach and Handel both knew of Corelli’s music. Modern listeners still enjoy his concerti grossi, especially the Christmas Concerto which has been used in several films. A virtuoso violinist until he was paralyzed by a stroke, Monsieur Vieuxtemps played a very special violin, the Vieuxtemps Guarneri del Gesù. This same violin is currently played by violinist Anne Akiko Meyers. Sir Edward German was a prolific composer who is best remembered these days for his incidental music for plays. Madison, Wisconsin native Lee Hoiby was influenced as a composer by Giancarlo Menotti. Sir Karl Jenkins has been a very successful composer of music for commercials and film scores. Principal cellist of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra for several years, Anner Bylsma was a leading exponent of what is called the Dutch Baroque school.

Photos: Portrait of Arcangelo Corelli, Unknown Author, Public Domain on Wikipedia.org; Henri Vieuxtemps, Lithograph by Josef Kriehuber, 1842, Public Domain on Wikipedia.org; Scan of out-of-copyright postcard of Edward German (1862-1936), Public Domain on Wikipedia.org; Photo of Lee Hoiby, Unknown Author, Estate of Lee Hoiby; Photo of Sir Karl Jenkins, Unknown Author;  Photo of Anner Bylsma, Unknown Author on Alchetron.


Friday, February 16, 2024

The Metropolitan Opera presents
Giuseppe Verdi’s Un Ballo in Maschera
Saturday, February 17, 1 p.m. Eastern

 

On February 16 we observe the birthdays of English composer Charles Avison (1709-1770), Israeli conductor Eliahu Inbal (1936-), and American composer John Corigliano (1938-).

Charles Avison was a writer and music critic in addition to being a composer. He is best known to 21st-century audiences for his 12 Concerti Grossi after Scarlatti. Maestro Inbal has been the conductor of the Czech Philharmonic and the Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra. Winner of both a Pulitzer Prize and a couple of Grammy Awards, John Corigliano has written over one hundred compositions.

Photos: Charles Avison, Unknown Author, Public Domain on Wikipedia.org; Eliahu Inbal, Oldsoft, Public Domain on Wikipedia.org; John Corigliano by Enid Bloch


Thursday, February 15, 2024

Education FundThe Classical Station is now accepting grant applications for the Education Fund. Nonprofit organizations with a focus on music education are encouraged to apply. The deadline is March 31st.

This evening, the Thursday Night Opera House presents Henry Purcell’s operas Dido and Aeneas, and The Fairy Queen. It’s a double bill, providing both tragedy and comedy! The Baroque gem, Dido and Aeneas, follows a tale of tragic love, while The Fairy Queen is based on A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

The curtain goes up at 7 p.m.

On February 15 we observe the birthdays of German composer Michael Praetorius (1571-1621) and French composer Jean Langlais (1907-1991).

His real name was Michael Schultze, Praetorius being the Latinized version of the German surname. A prolific composer, Herr Praetorius wrote thousands of works for instruments and voices. Blind since the age of two, Monsieur Langlais studied with Marcel Dupré, Paul Dukas, and Charles Tournemire. He was one of the 20th-century great organ recitalists.

Photos: Michael Praetorius, Unknown Author in Die großen Deutschen im Bilde, Public Domain on Wikipedia.org; Jean Langlais, Unknown Author on JeanLanglais.com


Wednesday, February 14, 2024

A very Happy Valentine’s Day to you! And a heartfelt Thank You to all of you who asked us to play your requests. We know you love classical music. Most of all, we know you love the Great Classical Music we play for you 24/7 here on The Classical Station.

Have a wonderful Valentine’s Day full of love from all of us here at The Classical Station.

On February 14 we observe the birthdays of Italian composer Francesco Cavalli (1602-1676), Swiss conductor Michel Corboz (1934-1921), and American soprano Renée Fleming (1959-).

Signor Cavalli’s real name was Pietro Francesco Caletti-Bruni. He wrote over forty operas, as well as some splendid polychoral sacred music. Maître Corboz founded the Ensemble Vocal de Lausanne. A Fulbright Scholar, Ms. Fleming studied with Elisabeth Schwarzkopf among other notable teachers. She has graced the stages of most of the world’s great opera houses.

Photos: Engraving of Francesco Cavalli in Enciclopedia italiana di scienze, lettere ed arti, éd. Istituto Giovanni Trecani, Unknown Author, Public Domain on Wikipedia.org; Michael Corboz, Eigenes Werk, CC by SA 3.0 on Wikipedia.org; Ms. Fleming/Andrew Eccles

 


Tuesday, February 13, 2024

Celebrate the special classical music lover in your life with a daily, weekly, or monthly announcement here on The Classical Station. With a Sustaining Membership of $100 per month, you can have a weekly on-air dedication. To find out more about day dedications and patron announcements on The Classical Station or to renew your announcement, contact our Membership Department at 800-556-5178.

On February 13 we observe the birthday of Spanish composer Fernando Sor (1778-1839). Known as a virtuoso classical guitarist, Fernando Sor o Josep Ferran Sorts i Muntades also found time to write over one hundred compositions in a variety of genres.

Photo: Fernando Sor by Godfrey Engelmann, Public Domain on Wikipedia.org


Monday, February 12, 2024

This evening, visit Warsaw, Poland, with us as we listen to a concert by the Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra, as it is known in English (Orkiestra Filharmonii Narodowej w Warszawie), founded in 1901, and the Warsaw Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra, founded in in the early part of the 20th-century. On the program are works by Leoš Janáček, Wojciech Dankowski, Robert Schumann, and more, conducted by Witold Rowicki (1950–55, 1958–77), Antoni Wit (2002–2013), and Marek Sewen.

Tell your smart speaker to “Play The Classical Station” at 8 p.m. Eastern.

On February 12 we observe the birthday of Czech composer Jan Ladislav Dussek (1760-1812). Besides being a prolific composer, Jan Dussek was highly regarded as a virtuoso pianist. He was also a much sought-after teacher.