This Week At The Classical Station

Photo: Dale Marie Muller, Roberts, Montana

This Week At The Classical Station

by Rob Kennedy

Sunday, January 15, 2023

The Black Oak Ensemble opens Preview! this evening with a performance of the Trio Suite for Violin, Viola, and Cello by Gustave Samazeuilh from their recording Avant l’orage : French String Trios (1926-1939). Naomi Lambert speaks with conductor Dmitri Sitkovetsky about the upcoming concert of the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra.

Preview! brings you new releases and local arts news at 6 p.m. Eastern every Sunday.

Renaissance Fare rings 2023 with the traditional Boar’s Head Carol sung by the King’s Singers, Twelfth Night Music by Michael Praetorius, and holiday dance music by the American Brass Quintet and the New York Renaissance Band.

Join George Douglas for Renaissance Fare at 5 p.m. Eastern.

Photo: From a drawing in Cassell’s Library of English Literature, Henry Morley, 1883, Fair Use, Public Domain Vectors

This morning Great Sacred Music includes music sung by The Gesualdo Six, the Leipzig Radio Chorus, and The Exon Singers. Also on the playlist is music by Johann Sebastian Bach, Cristobal de Morales, and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Great Sacred Music. Beautiful choral and organ music. Every Sunday morning. 8 a.m. Eastern. Right after Sing For Joy.  With Rob Kennedy.

On January 15 we observe the birthdays of American pianists Ruth Slenczynska (1925-) and Malcolm Frager (1935-1991) and Israeli-born American pianist Joseph Kalichstein (1946-). A musician who was interested in finding manuscripts by older composers as well as performing, Malcolm Frager maintained a very full concert schedule until his untimely death at the age of 56. Ms. Slenczynska studied with legendary pianists Alfred Cortot and Arthur Schnabel, among others. Happy 98th birthday! Joseph Kalichstein is a member of the faculty of The Julliard School. He performs regularly internationally.

Photos: Malcolm Frager, Author Unknown; Joseph Kalichstein by Fred Collins


Saturday, January 14, 2022

Danube River

This weekend we are exploring the music of Eastern Europe. While political events have dramatically changed the lives of people in Eastern Europe and the former U.S.S.R., the one constant has been the undying beauty of the music written by Eastern European composers. We will feature the music of Chopin, Liszt, Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, Lysenko, and many other composers this weekend.  See the Daily Playlist for details.

The Metropolitan Opera’s 2022-23 season of live Saturday matinee radio broadcasts continues with Fedora, Umberto Giordano’s romantically charged murder mystery, which has returned to the Met stage for the first time in 25 years. Soprano Sonya Yoncheva stars in the title role as the Russian princess haunted by the consequences of her own blind passion. Tenor Piotr Beczała is her lover, Count Loris, who is ensnared in a web of romantic and political recriminations. The cast also features soprano Rosa Feola and baritone Lucas Meachem, in a new production by David McVicar. Maestro Marco Armiliato conducts the Met orchestra and chorus in Giordano’s opulent score.

The curtain goes up at 1 p.m. Eastern.

On January 14 we observe the birthdays of early music specialist Nicholas McGegan (1950-), Latvian conductor Mariss Jansons (1943-2019), English violinist Andrew Manze (1965-), and Canadian tenor Ben Heppner (1956-).

A highly-regarded early music specialist, Nicholas McGegan has over 100 recordings to his credit. You can listen to an interview with him on our Conversations With Conductors page. A protégé of Herbert von Karajan, Mariss Jansons conducted most of the world’s top orchestras. A Baroque violin virtuoso, Andrew Manze also enjoys a fine reputation as a conductor. Now retired from his singing career, Ben Heppner has embarked on a new role as a broadcaster with the CBC.

Today is also the birthday of Ludwig Ritter von Köchel, the Austrian musicologist who cataloged Mozart’s compositions.

Photos: Nicholas McGegan by Steve Sherman; Mariss Jansons on Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra; Andrew Manze by Chris Christodoulou; Ben Heppner in The Canadian Encyclopedia


Friday, January 13, 2023

The Metropolitan Opera presents
Umberto Giordano’s Fedora
Saturday, January 14 at 1 p.m. Eastern

On January 13 we observe the birthdays of German composer Christoph Graupner (1683-1760), Russian composer Vasily Kalinnikov (1866-1901), and English composer Richard Addinsell (1904-1977).

Herr Graupner lived at the same time as Johann Sebastian Bach, Georg Philipp Telemann, and George Frideric Handel. Graupner had to turn down the post of Cantor at Leipzig. The runner-up, a musician by the name of Johann Sebastian Bach, got the position instead. Vasily Sergeyevich Kalinnikov managed to compose approximately 40 works including 2 symphonies before he died at age 35 of tuberculosis. Richard Addinsell’s Warsaw Concerto, written for the film Dangerous Moonlight (1941), has been recorded over one hundred times and has sold over a million copies.

Photos: No image of Christoph Graupner available. Portrait of Graupner’s patron, Ernest Louis, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt, Public Domain on Wikipedia.org; Photo of Vasily Kalinnikov, Public Domain on Wikipedia.org; Photo of Richard Addinsell from the estate of Kenneth Hughes in the National Portrait Gallery, London


Thursday, January 12, 2023

This evening the Thursday Night Opera House presents Camille Saint-Saens’ Henry VIII. The dramatic action in this opera revolves around Henry VIII’s (Rouillon) divorce from Catherine of Aragon (Command) and marriage to Anne Boleyn (Vignon). Camille Saint-Saëns’ lush orchestration abounds in this 1895 work.

The curtain goes up at 7 p.m. Dr. Jay Pierson hosts.

On January 12 we observe the birthdays of Italian composer Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari (1876-1948) and American composer Morton Feldman (1926-1987).

Although he wrote 13 operas, Signor Wolf-Ferrari is probably best known for the opera Il Gioiello della Madonna. Like his contemporary John Cage, Morton Feldman wrote indeterminate music.
Photos: Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari, Public Domain, on Wikipedia.org; Morton Feldman, Rob Bogaerts, CC0 on Wikipedia.org


Wednesday, January 11, 2023

Danube River, Fair Use, Wikimedia.org

Looking ahead, we have an Exploring Eastern Europe weekend coming up. While political events have dramatically changed the lives of people in Eastern Europe and the former U.S.S.R., the one constant has been the undying beauty of the music written by Eastern European composers. We will feature the music of Chopin, Liszt, Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, Lysenko, and many other composers this weekend.

On January 11 we observe the birthdays of Russian composer Reinhold Glière (1875-1956), and French composer Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986).

Born in Kiev, Reinhold Moritzevich Glière was a student of Sergei TaneyevMikhail Ippolitov-Ivanov, and Anton Arensky. Besides composing he taught at the Moscow Gnesin School of Music and the Moscow Conservatory. Trained as an organist, Maurice Duruflé was Louis Vierne’s assistant at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. He also held the post of organist at St-Étienne-du-Mont, and taught harmony at the Conservatoire. Duruflé was highly critical of his compositions and consequently allowed very few to be published.

Photos: Reinhold Glière, Unknown author, Public Domain, Wikipedia.org; Maurice Duruflé, Unknown author, CC BY 2.5, Wikipedia.org


Tuesday, January 10, 2023

One of the many ways that you can help The Classical Station to continue playing classical music for years to come is to leave a planned gift in your will or estate. Leaving a legacy gift to The Classical Station will help ensure that the station has a solid foundation to continue operating for generations to come. Educational Information Corporation is the legal name of The Classical Station. The station is a nonprofit, listener-supported radio station—it relies on your tax-deductible support for its funding.

Dan McHugh can answer your questions about planned giving. His email address is dan@theclassicalstation.org

On January 10 we observe the birthdays of Swedish composer Tor Aulin (1866-1914), French conductor Jean Martinon (1910-1976), American baritone Sherrill Milnes (1935-), American bass-baritone James Morris (1947-), Latvian-born Israeli cellist Mischa Maisky (1948-), and American violinist Nadja Solerno-Sonnenberg (1961-).

Although he was a violinist, Tor Aulin was also the conductor of the Stockholm and Gothenburg Symphony Orchestras. 20th-century conductor, Monsieur Martinon conducted many of the world’s great orchestras and was associated with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra from 1963-1968. Considered one of the great Verdi baritones, Sherrill Milnes has appeared with most of the world’s opera companies. He also has recorded extensively with more than 135 recordings to his credit. You can listen to our conversation with Sherrill Milnes on our Conversations With Singers page. Baltimore native James Morris is perhaps best remembered for his role as Wotan in Die Walkure. A student of the great cellists Mstislav Rostropovich and Gregor Piatigorsky, Mischa Maisky has over 50 recordings to his credit. After studying at the Curtis Institute of Music and the Juilliard School of Music, Ms. Salerno-Sonnenberg has appeared as a soloist with many of the world’s major orchestras.

Photos: Tor Aulin, Public Domain on Wikipedia.org; Jean Martinon, Author Unknown; Sherrill Milnes by Dario Acosta; Mischa Maisky by Yeugene on Wikipedia.org, CC SA-3.0; Nadja Salerno Sonnenberg/WWNO


Monday, January 9, 2023

Monday Night at the symphony (with 'Monday Night' in flowing script)This evening, Monday Night at the Symphony features the Danish National Symphony Orchestra which was founded in 1925. Thomas Dausgaard, Gennady Rozhdestvensky, and Gerd Albrecht lead a program of music by Joseph Joachim, Hans Christian Lumbye, Richard Wagner, and more. The concert begins at 8 p.m. Eastern.

Renaissance Fare rings in the New Year with the traditional Boar’s Head Carol by the King’s Singers, Twelfth Night Music by Michael Praetorius, holiday dance music by the American Brass Quintet and the New York Renaissance Band, and much more.

Join George Douglas for Renaissance Fare at 7 p.m. Eastern.

Photo: From a drawing in Cassell’s Library of English Literature, Henry Morley, 1883, Fair Use, Public Domain Vectors

On January 9 we observe the birthday of American composer John Knowles Paine (1839-1906). Paine was a member of a group of composers known as the Boston Six. The others were Amy Beach, Arthur Foote, Edward MacDowell, George Chadwick, and Horatio Parker. He was Harvard University’s first organist and choirmaster, as well as its first professor of music.

Photo: Unknown author, Public Domain on Wikipedia.org