This Week At The Classical Station

Photo: Dale Marie Muller, Roberts, Moontana

This Week At The Classical Station

by Rob Kennedy

Sunday, January 8, 2022

Guitarist Xuefei Yang opens Preview! this evening with a performance of Agustín Barrios’ La Catedral. Rob Kennedy speaks with English choral director Andrew Nethsingha about the Choir of St. John’s College, Cambridge’s recording The Psalms.

Preview! brings you new releases and local arts news at 6 p.m. Eastern.

The January edition of My Life In Music looks back at some of our guests during 2022. We’ll sample conversations we had with composers Joan Tower and Terry Mizesko, cellist Ofra Harnoy, and pianist Anne-Marie McDermott. My Life In Music is made possible by our listeners and by The Chamber Orchestra of the Triangle. For information about the Chamber Orchestra’s upcoming concerts, visit their website, theCOT.org.

Join Rob Kennedy for My Life In Music on this afternoon at 5 p.m. Eastern.

This morning Great Sacred Music includes music sung by The Cambridge Singers, Anonymous 4, and The Sixteen. Also on the playlist is music by Johann Sebastian Bach, Herbert Howells, and David Arcus. As well, at 10 a.m. we’ll feature A Procession for Epiphany.

Great Sacred Music. Beautiful choral and organ music. Every Sunday morning. 8 a.m. Eastern. Right after Sing For Joy.  With Rob Kennedy.


Saturday, January 7, 2023

The Metropolitan Opera’s 2022-23 season of Saturday matinee radio broadcasts continues with Luigi Cherubini’s Medea, a performance from last fall when this rarely heard opera launched the Met’s season. Soprano Sondra Radvanovsky won ovations for her electrifying performance in the title role of the mythological sorceress who exacts devastating revenge when she’s betrayed. The cast also featured tenor Matthew Polenzani as Medea’s faithless lover, joined by Janai Brugger, Ekaterina Gubanova, and Michele Pertusi. Carlo Rizzi conducted the Met orchestra and chorus in this remarkable score, which bridges the classical and romantic eras.

The curtain goes up at 1 p.m. Eastern.

On January 7 we observe the birthdays of German conductor Günter Wand (1912-2002), French composer Francis Poulenc (1899-1963), French flute virtuoso Jean-Pierre Rampal (1922-2000), and English violinist and conductor Iona Brown (1941-2004).

A largely self-taught conductor, Herr Wand directed the North German Radio Symphony Orchestra from 1982-1990. Monsieur Poulenc was one of the group of French composers known as Les Six. The son of a professional flutist, Monsieur Rampal’s name became synonymous with the flute in the 20th century. His recordings and his presence on the concert stage were ubiquitous. Ms. Brown was associated with the Academy of St Martin in the Fields from 1964-1980 as a leader, soloist, and director.

Photos: Günter Wand, Author Unknown; Francis Poulenc, www.poulenc.fr; Jean-Pierre Rampal, Wikipedia.org,CC BY-SA 2.0; Iona Brown, Arkivmusic.com


Friday, January 6, 2023

The Metropolitan Opera presents
Luigi Cherubini’s Medea
Saturday, January 7 at 1 p.m. Eastern

On January 6 we observe the birthdays of four composers: Giuseppe SammartiniGiuseppe MartucciAlexander Scriabin, and Max Bruch.

Born in Milan, Italy, Giuseppe Francesco Gaspare Melchiorre Baldassare Sammartini spent most of his professional life in London. He left us over 100 works. While primarily a composer, Signor Martucci was also a conductor. He introduced the music of Richard Wagner to Italian audiences. A native of Moscow, Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin studied at the Moscow Conservatory. He wrote much music for the piano and indeed recorded over a dozen of his compositions on piano rolls. Born in Cologne, Germany, Max Karl August Bruch is perhaps best-known to 21st-century listeners for his Scottish Fantasy and the Violin Concerto No. in G minor.

Photos: Giuseppe Sammartini, portrait by Donino Riccardi, Public Domain on Wikipedia.org; Giuseppe Martucci, Public Domain on Wikipedia.org; Alexander Scriabin, Unknown Author; Max Bruch on max-bruch-gesellschaft.de.


Thursday, January 5, 2023

This evening the Thursday Night Opera House presents Giachino Rossini’s Il Barbiere di Siviglia. Count Almaviva, sung by Jerry Hadley, is in love with Rosina, sung by Susanne Mentzer. Since her uncle, sung by Bruno Praticò, is trying to keep her away from all other men, the Count enlists the help of Figaro, sung by Thomas Hampson. This 1816 opera buffa is considered the pinnacle of musical comedy.

The curtain goes up at 7 p.m. Eastern. Dr. Jay Pierson hosts.

On January 5 we observe the birthdays of Italian pianist Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli (1920-1995), German pianist Alfred Brendel (1931-), and Italian pianist Maurizio Pollini (1942-).

Signor Michelangeli was one of the great pianists of the 20th century. He taught Maurizio Pollini and Martha Argerich. One of the great pianists of our time, Alfred Brendel is renowned for his Beethoven performances and recordings. Happy 90th birthday, Herr Brendel! Signor Pollini is highly regarded for his interpretation of piano music, especially that of late 20th and early 21st-century composers such as Pierre Boulez and Karlheinz Stockhausen.

Photos: Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli, Author Unknown, Last FM; Alfred Brendel, CC 2.0 on Wikipedia.org; Maurizio Pollini, CC BY-SA 3.0, Wikipedia.org

Wednesday, January 4, 2023

Today we observe the birthdays of Italian composer Giovanni Battista Pergolesi (1710-1736), Czech composer Josef Suk (1874-1935), and American mezzo-soprano Grace Bumbry (1937-).

While Signor Pergolesi composed operas, it is his sacred work Stabat Mater which is most performed these days. Josef Suk wrote chamber music. Lots of it. He also married Antonin Dvorak’s daughter. Ms. Bumbry studied at the Boston University College of Fine Arts and Northwestern University. During her career, she appeared in major opera houses throughout the world.

Photo: Grace Bumbry, Federal Government, Public Domain on Wikipedia.org


Tuesday, January 3, 2023

When you give $200 or more to The Classical Station, you can request a Day Dedication as your Thank You Gift. We will run a short announcement written by you four times on the day you choose. Many listeners use a Day Dedication to celebrate birthdays, anniversaries, and memorials of those special to them.

Contact our Membership Department at 800-556-5178 for more information about setting up a Day Dedication. Thank you for supporting The Classical Station.

Go the last mile with your used vehicle. If your automobile (or truck, boat, motorcycle, RV, or aircraft) is no longer of use to you, it can still go a long way as a donation in support of the programs you love here at The Classical Station.  Center for Car Donations (CFCD) manages the donations on our behalf. Call them toll-free at 877-WCPEUSA for more information or to begin the car donation process. (Don’t forget to indicate that WCPE is the recipient of your donation.) A CFCD representative will schedule a pickup that’s convenient for you and provide you with confirmation of your donation. We will mail you a confirmation that states how much your vehicle sold for at auction. This amount is what you can claim on your itemized tax return.

You will also receive a one-year subscription to Quarter Notes, our program guide and member magazine.


Monday, January 2, 2023

Monday Night at the symphony (with 'Monday Night' in flowing script)This evening Monday Night at the Symphony features the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra which was founded in 1945. Robert Spano, Yoel Levi, and Donald Runnicles lead a program of music by Ralph Vaughan Williams, Peter Tchaikovsky, Richard Wagner, and more.

The concert begins at 8 p.m. Eastern.

The January edition of My Life In Music looks back at some of our guests during 2022. We’ll sample conversations we had with composers Joan Tower and Terry Mizesko, cellist Ofra Harnoy, and pianist Anne-Marie McDermott. My Life In Music is made possible by our listeners and by The Chamber Orchestra of the Triangle. For information about the Chamber Orchestra’s upcoming concerts, visit their website, theCOT.org.

Join Rob Kennedy for My Life In Music on this evening at 7 p.m. Eastern.

On January 2 we observe the birthdays of Russian composer Mili Balakirev (1837-1910), English composer Sir Michael Tippett (1905-1998), and American clarinetist David Shifrin (1950-).

Balakirev influenced a generation of Russian composers with his compositional techniques and nationalistic bent. A life-long pacifist, Sir Michael Tippett is perhaps best known for A Child of Our Time, which was the composer’s reaction to the horror of Kristallnacht. Mr. Shifrin has served as principal clarinetist with the Cleveland Orchestra, American Symphony Orchestra, the Honolulu and Dallas symphonies, and the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and New York Chamber Symphony.

Photo: Sir Michael Tippett, Unknown Author, Schott & Co., Fair Use, Wikipedia.org