This Week At The Classical Station

Photo: Ian Kennedy

This Week At The Classical Station

by Rob Kennedy

Sunday, July 17, 2022

This evening on Preview! pianist Charles-Richard Hamelin plays Frédéric Chopin’s Prelude in A flat, Op. 28 No. 17.  Caleb Gardner speaks with Brazilian guitarist Plinio Fernandes about his recently-released recording Saudade.

Preview! brings you the best in new classical recordings and arts news, Sundays at 6 p.m. Eastern.

The July edition of Renaissance Fare features one of the most popular composers of the Italian Renaissance, Claudio Monteverdi. He is considered a transitional figure in the progression from the Renaissance into the Baroque period. On the program is music from L’Orfeo that is considered to be the oldest opera still being performed.

Get out your tabrets and tell your smart speaker to “Play The Classical Station” at 5 p.m. Eastern. George Douglas hosts.

Photo: From a drawing in Cassell’s Library of English Literature, Henry Morley, 1883

 

This morning Great Sacred Music includes music sung by the Choir of All Saints’ Episcopal Church, Beverly Hills, the Swiss Radio Chorus of Lugano, and the Bach Collegium Japan. Also on the playlist is music by Johann Sebastian Bach, Henry Purcell, and Franz Schmidt. Celebrated organist Todd Wilson offers a commentary on Gerre Hancock’s Prelude and Fugue on Union Seminary. The playlist with program notes can be found on the Great Sacred Music page.

Great Sacred Music. Beautiful choral and organ music. Every Sunday morning. 8 a.m. Eastern. Right after Sing For Joy. With Rob Kennedy.

On July 17 we observe the birthdays of American sopranos Eleanor Steber (1914-1990) and Dawn Upshaw (1960-) and American composer and authority on P.D.Q Bach, Peter Schickele (1935-).

A West Virginia native, Ms. Steber graced the stages of major opera houses during her career. She also appeared on some of the popular radio programs of the day. Grammy Award winner Dawn Upshaw is equally at home singing operatic roles or art songs. The discoverer of the hitherto unknown composer P.D.Q. Bach, Peter Schickele is an accomplished bassoonist.  Happy 87th birthday, Professor!

Photo of Ms. Upshaw: John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation


Saturday, July 16, 2022

WCPE Car Donation Program

Car Donation Program

Go the last mile with your used vehicle. If your automobile (or truck, boat, motorcycle, RV, or aircraft) is no longer of use to you, it can still go a long way as a donation in support of the programs you love here at The Classical Station.

Here’s How it Works:
Center for Car Donations (CFCD) manages the donations on our behalf. Call them toll-free at 877-WCPEUSA for more information or to begin the car donation process. (Don’t forget to indicate that WCPE is the recipient of your donation.) A CFCD representative will schedule a pickup that’s convenient for you and provide you with confirmation of your donation. We will mail you a confirmation that states how much your vehicle sold for at auction. This amount is what you can claim on your itemized tax return.

You will also receive a one-year subscription to Quarter Notes, our program guide and member magazine.

On July 16 we observe the birthdays of Soviet-born American pianist Bella Davidovich (1928-), Scottish conductor Bryden Thomson (1928-1991), and Israeli violinist Pinchas Zukerman (1948-) Bella Mikhaylovna Davidovich was just nine years old when she performed Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 1. Madame Davidovich is the mother of Greensboro Symphony’s conductor Dmitri Sitkovetsky. Happy 94th birthday! Bryden Thomson was a champion of the music of English and Scottish composers. Israeli violinist Pinchas Zukerman has earned two GRAMMY awards and enjoys a fine reputation as a conductor. 

Photo: Bella Davidovich, Joop van Bilsen/Anefo, CC BY-SA 3.0 nl, Wikimedia Commons


Friday, July 15, 2022

When your destination is The Classical Station, you’re on a journey whose goal is to enrich, excite, inspire, and relax. The strings, the keyboards, the brass, the percussion, the voices – classical is music for thinkers, for explorers, and for people who seek a deeper and richer experience in life. But the music doesn’t play for free. It’s funded by the people who listen – by people who want the door to inspiration to always be open. It’s funded by YOU.

Put a down payment on your next journey now with your donation to The Classical Station. Give securely online, on our app,via the mail to The Classical Station, PO Box 828, Wake Forest, NC 27588, and anytime by calling 800-556-5178.

On July 15 we observe the birthdays of three English musicians: guitarist Julian Bream (1933-2020), and composers Geoffrey Burgon (1941-2010) and Harrison Birtwistle (1934-).

Julian Bream won four Grammy Awards for his playing. He was widely considered one of the greatest classical guitarists of the 20th century.  Geoffrey Burgon wrote scores for film and television. The income from his music for Monty Python’s Life of BrianTinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and Brideshead Revisited allowed Burgon to indulge his love of other musical styles.  Harrison Birtwistle’s style of composing is distinctive. He often writes music that he disassembles so that he can rearrange it, all with good dramatic effect.

Photo: Julian Bream, Unknown Author, Sol Hurok Enterprises, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons


Thursday, July 14, 2022

Celebrate all that is French in classical music this Thursday with a special day of works inspired by French artists or written by French composers. Gossec, Liszt, Farrenc, and Debussy all feature on this Bastille Day celebration of “la musique” capped off by a performance of the opera Romeo et Juliet by Charles Gounod with commentary by Dr. Jay Pierson. A bientot!

Today we observe the birthday of English composer Gerald Finzi (1901-1956).

Besides being a composer who knew Gustav Holst, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Sir Arthur Bliss, Finzi conducted an amateur orchestra where he gave young performers such as tomorrow’s birthday celebrant, Julian Bream, a chance to perform publicly.

Photo: geraldfinzi.com


Wednesday, July 13, 2022

Most of our operating budget comes from listeners like you, from people who love and treasure classical music.  Your financial support delivers Mozart and Brahms, the power of Mahler and Beethoven, and the beauty of Schubert and Haydn 24/7 here on The Classical Station. Whether it’s early music or baroque or twentieth-century masters or all the treasures that lie between, there would be no great classical music without you. Your donation today plays the classical music of tomorrow and days to come on The Classical Station.

Give securely online, on our app, via the mail at The Classical Station, PO Box 828, Wake Forest, North Carolina 27588, or by calling 800-556-5178 anytime. A member of staff is always on duty.

Photo: Blue Diamond, Fair Use


Tuesday, July 12, 2022

WCPE Car Donation Program

Car Donation Program

Go the last mile with your used vehicle. If your vehicle – automobile, truck, boat, motorcycle, RV, or aircraft – is no longer of use to you, it can still go a long way as a donation in support of the programs you rely on from The Classical Station. Here’s how it works: Center for Car Donations (CFCD), manages the donations on our behalf. Call them toll-free at 1-877-927-3872 for more information and to begin the car donation process. Don’t forget to mention that The Classical Station is the recipient of your donation.

A CFCD representative will schedule a pickup that’s convenient for you, and provide you with confirmation of your donation. We will mail you a confirmation that states how much your vehicle sold for at auction. This amount is what you can claim on your itemized tax return. You also will be entitled to a one-year subscription to our member magazine, Quarter Notes.

Photo: CFCD

On July 12 we observe the birthdays of Russian composer Anton Arensky (1861-1906), English composer George Butterworth (1885-1916), Norwegian soprano Kirsten Flagstad (1895-1962), American pianist Van Cliburn (1934-2013), and American clarinetist Richard Stoltzman (1942-).

Anton Stepanovich Arensky studied composition with Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. The other major influence on the young Russian was Pyotr Tchaikovsky. George Butterworth was killed in World War I during the Battle of the Somme. Ms. Flagstad was a highly regarded Wagnerian soprano. She made her Metropolitan Opera debut in Die Walkure on February 2, 1935. Louisiana native Van Cliburn stunned the musical world when he won the International Tchaikovsky Piano Competition in 1958. The competition was held every four years in Moscow. You can imagine the sensation an American made winning a Russian competition during the Cold War! Nebraska native Richard Stoltzman is a clarinetist who is acclaimed for his classical music playing. He is on the faculty of the New England Conservatory and Boston University.

Photo: George Butterworth, Unknown Author, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons


Monday, July 11, 2022

This evening Monday Night at the Symphony features the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields. On the program is music by Benjamin Britten, J.S. Bach, and Ludwig van Beethoven in performances conducted by Iona Brown, Sir Neville Marriner, and current music director Joshua Bell.

The concert begins at 8 p.m. Eastern.

 

The July edition of Renaissance Fare features one of the most popular composers of the Italian Renaissance, Claudio Monteverdi. He is considered a transitional figure in the progression from the Renaissance into the Baroque period. On the program is music from L’Orfeo that is considered to be the oldest opera still being performed.

Get out your tabrets and tell your smart speaker to “Play The Classical Station” at 7 p.m. Eastern. George Douglas hosts.

Photo: From a drawing in Cassell’s Library of English Literature, Henry Morley, 1883

 

Herbert Blomstedt
Foto: Micke Grönberg/Sveriges Radio

On July 11 we observe the birthdays of Swedish tenor Nicolai Gedda (1925-2017), and American conductor Herbert Blomstedt (1927-).

Gedda made his debut at the age of 26 singing a role in Adolphe Adam’s opera “Le postillon de Lonjumeau” which has one of the most demanding parts for tenor ever written. Gedda tossed it off with great aplomb. He died earlier this year. The following sentence from Wikipedia illustrates what a remarkable conductor Maestro Blomstedt is. “Blomstedt is currently Conductor Laureate of the San Francisco Symphony and Honorary Conductor of the Bamberg Symphony, Danish National Symphony Orchestra, NHK Symphony, Swedish Radio Symphony, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra and Staatskapelle Dresden.”