WCPE Arts Addendum


Listen to Preview every Sunday night from 6-9pm (Eastern) for information on upcoming arts events!

Classical Voice North Carolina is a wonderful resource for our North Carolina listeners. Find comprehensive arts calendars and performance reviews at CVNC.org!

  


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If you love Symphonic Music and have ever dreamed of being able to play in an orchestra, now may be your chance! Announcing a new class

Beginning Strings for Adults

In this class, you will learn the basics of playing the violin, viola, or cello, as well as acquire the fundamental music reading and listening skills essential for all musicians. Instruction takes place in a supportive setting with other adult learners at Meredith College.

Classes begin August 26. Enroll through Meredith College’s Community School of Music. Registration closes August 21.

Register: Click here!

At the completion of coursework, you will have he opportunity to join the Triangle Community Orchestra, a group of adult amateur musicians who play for the love of great music. Taught by Raleigh Medal of Arts winner and former PA conductor Marta Findlay- Partridge.

For those with prior instrumental experience, TCO offers the opportunity to rebuild playing skills in a low stress, enjoyable and collegial learning environment.





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CONTACT: Joe Newberry 919.789.5484
jnewberry@ncsymphony.org
Find press releases and downloadable photos at ncsymphony.org/media/



North Carolina Symphony Launches 2015 Rex Healthcare Summerfest Series May 23

William Henry Curry Conducts Rhapsody in Blue with pianist Timo Andres; Program also Features Dvorák's New World Symphony, Copland, and Sousa; Citizen Musicians Join in for "Play with the Pros;" Kids 12 and Under Free on Lawn

CARY, N.C. - The North Carolina Symphony launches its 2015 Rex Healthcare Summerfest Series at Cary's Booth Amphitheatre on Saturday, May 23, at 7:30 p.m., with a concert program that features pianist Timo Andres performing Gershwin's incomparable Rhapsody in Blue, the orchestra's performance of Dvorák's New World Symphony, and other works by Copland and Sousa that feature "citizen musicians" as they join the orchestra.

The concert program, led by Resident Conductor and Summerfest Artistic Director William Henry Curry, also features "Hoe Down" from Rodeo and An Outdoor Overture by Aaron Copland, and The Liberty Bell March by John Philip Sousa featuring "citizen musicians" performing with the North Carolina Symphony during "Play with the Pros." When the citizen musicians join the Symphony on stage, the orchestra's size will nearly double for those selections.

Composer and pianist Timo Andres performed Rhapsody in Blue with the Symphony during the 2014-15 classical season to great acclaim. Mr. Andres' new works include a piano quintet for Jonathan Biss and the Elias String Quartet, commissioned and presented by Wigmore Hall, Carnegie Hall, the Concertgebouw Amsterdam and San Francisco Performances; a solo piano work for Kirill Gerstein, commissioned by the Gilmore Foundation; a new string quartet for the Library of Congress, premiered by the Attacca Quartet; and a new piece for the group yMusic.

This summer marks the 30th anniversary of performances in Cary and the orchestra's 15th season in the stunning lakeside pavilion built by the Town of Cary, a major sponsor of Summerfest. Gates open for the concerts series at 5:30 p.m., except for Independence Day, when they open at 3 p.m. Thanks to sponsor Golden Corral, children 12 and under are admitted free on the lawn, so attending a North Carolina Symphony concert at Booth Amphitheatre is a wonderful summer bargain for families.





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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Parker

April 16, 2015 919 747-8452

CAROLINA BALLET ANNOUNCES 2015-2016 SEASON

Shakespeare’s Works are Highlights of 18th Season

RALEIGH, NC - - - Carolina Ballet is pleased to announce the lineup of productions for the company’s eighteenth season, the second half of which will be devoted to commemorating the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death. The programs will be performed in either the A.J. Fletcher Theater (AJF) or Raleigh Memorial Auditorium (RMA) at the Duke Energy Center in downtown Raleigh; or in Durham at the Durham Performing Arts Center (DPAC). There will be seven programs, comprised of new work and ballets from Carolina Ballet’s repertory, throughout the season; and the annual Nutcracker in December at Memorial Hall in Chapel Hill, in Durham (DPAC) and Raleigh (RMA). The schedule of productions is as follows:

The Planets (premiere) – September 24-27, 2015 (RMA)

Symphonie Fantastique (premiere) with A Dancerly Response – October 8-25 (AJF)

Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 – November 19-22 (RMA)

Nutcracker – December 5 & 6 (Memorial Hall, Chapel Hill)

December 12 & 13 (DPAC

December 18-27 (RMA)

Love Speaks – February 4-21, 2016 (AJF)

Tempest Fantasy – March 3-20, (AJF)

Macbeth (premiere) – April 14-17, (RMA)

April 30 & May 1 (DPAC)

A Midsummer Night’s Dream – May 12-15, (RMA)

The season opens with a series of programs choreographed to very well known and often requested classical music. The first program offers new choreography by artistic director Robert Weiss and Choreographer in Residence Zalman Raffael for Gustav Holst’s The Planets. There have been many danced productions to this symphonic music but Carolina Ballet’s production of this new ballet happens to fall within the hundred year anniversary of The Planets. In October Carolina Ballet will present new choreography to “Un Bal,” the second movement, of Hector Berlioz’ Symphonie Fantastique, along with Robert Weiss’ A Dancerly Response to A Musical Offering composed by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1747 for Frederick II of Prussia. The News and Observer critic wrote about A Dancerly Response when it premiered in 2010, “The music’s 15 brief sections are gentle and contemplative, Weiss’ choreography reflecting every nuance and shift.”

The weekend before Thanksgiving week Carolina Ballet is bringing back Robert Weiss’ Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 which premiered to great critical acclaim in 2011. This is a huge ballet but it works, says the critic on Triangle Arts & Entertainment, “The joyous dancing to Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 matched the intensity of the grand music….Through Weiss’ choreography more subtle aspects of the music are drawn to the front, so that a familiar piece of music is refreshed and new. Robert Weiss, possessed by the inspiration of a great composer, has created an epic ballet.” This program will include one or two other pieces from Carolina Ballet’s extensive repertory.

Following Carolina Ballet’s run of twenty Nutcracker performances throughout the Triangle during December, Robert Weiss will devote the final four productions of the season to William Shakespeare, in honor of the 400th anniversary of his death in April 1616. Shakespeare was a contemporary of Sir Walter Raleigh’s (1554-1618) so it seems even more meaningful that Carolina Ballet pay tribute to the Bard in Raleigh with several programs inspired by his plays and sonnets.

The centerpiece of the four Shakespeare productions will be a new full evening Macbeth (April 14-17, 2016) choreographed by artistic director Robert Weiss to a specially commissioned score by J. Mark Scearce, former head of the music department at North Carolina State University. Dr. Scearce has worked with Carolina Ballet on several occasions starting in 1999 when he created music for The Kreutzer Sonata to augment the scores of Beethoven and Janacek. He also composed the music for Guernica and The Song of the Dead on the Picasso program, and for Dracula and The Masque of the Red Death.

Prior to the new Macbeth Carolina Ballet will reprise Lynne Taylor-Corbett’s Love Speaks (February 4-21) described as “a charming romantic romp for five couples” set to music of Vivaldi, Corelli and Purcell; and Tempest Fantasy (March 3-20) to the 2004 Pulitzer Prize winning score by Paul Moravec. Artistic director Robert Weiss calls Tempest Fantasy a dance meditation of Shakespeare’s dramatic play The Tempest featuring the well known characters of Caliban, Ariel, Prospero, Miranda and a violent ship wreck. Carolina Ballet will include several other shorter ballets from its repertory on these two programs.

The season will end with one of the most popular of Shakespeare’s comedies – A Midsummer Night’s Dream (May 12-15) choreographed by George Balanchine to the magnificent score of Felix Mendelssohn. This delightfully humorous and poignant ballet is full of Shakespeare’s colorful characters and many twists of fate. It is always a crowd pleaser.

As mentioned above, Carolina Ballet will present twenty Nutcracker performances in Chapel Hill at Memorial Hall December 5 & 6; in Durham at DPAC December 12 & 13; and at Raleigh Memorial Auditorium December 18-27. With the addition of a new illusion this past season, Carolina Ballet’s Nutcracker offers more surprises than ever as people disappear and reappear leaving audience members wondering how they did that. Carolina Ballet’s Nutcracker features live music for the popular Tchaikovsky score conducted by Alfred E. Sturgis. Patrons who purchase a 2015-2016 season subscription may purchase their Nutcracker tickets before they go on sale to the general public, ensuring the best seats in the house.

For subscription information, patrons are encouraged to call the Carolina Ballet Box Office at 919 719-0900. One may select a complete subscription of all seven programs, or a Carolina Ballet representative will put together a subscription package that includes the ballets of choice that best fits the schedule and budget of the individual subscriber.

Carolina Ballet, Inc. has rapidly taken its place among America’s premier arts organizations. Under the innovative direction of artistic director Robert Weiss, a talented company, fiscally responsible management and community support, Carolina Ballet exposes audiences to traditional ballet by legendary masters and new works of contemporary choreographers. The upcoming eighteenth season represents the vibrant entrepreneurial spirit and ever-increasing quality of life experienced here in North Carolina.





CHAUTAUQUA, N.Y. — Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra is pleased to announce its 2015 season, opening Thursday, July 2, with the debut of new music director Maestro Rossen Milanov, and concluding Tuesday, Aug. 25. All performances take place in the Chautauqua Institution Amphitheater.

This summer, CSO seeks to balance tradition and innovation through several exciting new initiatives that audiences will encounter throughout the season. Highlights include a Tuesday evening series of musical exploration, a Sunday afternoon matinee, an exclusive preview of a new concerto by legendary jazz musician Wynton Marsalis, two powerhouse performances of Carmina Burana and the world premiere of a contemporary piece that ties in with one of Chautauqua Institution’s signature weekly lecture themes.

“We are thrilled to welcome some of today’s most influential musical figures, but most importantly to establish a close connection between tradition and modernity, historical context and the sheer energy of our performances,” Milanov said. “I hope that all attendees will find our 2015 season illuminating, inspiring and intriguing.”

As ninth music director of the CSO, Milanov will lead 11 of the orchestra’s 21 performances, including three in new series titled “CSO: Into the Music.” These 60- to 90-minute, intermission-free concerts on Tuesday evenings will be conversational in nature as Milanov shares insights about the evening’s music and composers. The series consists of “A Visit the Museum” on July 7, “The Genius of Mozart” on July 28 and “Exploring Golijov” on Aug. 18.

For the first time in more than 20 years, the CSO will perform a matinee concert on Sunday, Aug. 9 — as with all Sunday programs at Chautauqua, admittance to the grounds and the Amphitheater is free. This “audience choice” performance, conducted by Milanov, will be programmed by soliciting votes through social media leading up to the date.

During Week Eight of Chautauqua’s season, musician, composer and educator Wynton Marsalis and violinist Nicola Benedetti will be in residence at Chautauqua to work on Marsalis’ first violin concerto. The pair will present a preview performance with the CSO and guest conductor Cristian Macelaru on Aug. 22. The London Symphony Orchestra will perform the world premiere of the concerto with Benedetti on Nov. 6, 2015.

Carmina Burana by Carl Orff will serve as Chautauqua’s 2015 inter-arts production. Directed by retiring Vice President and Director of Programming Marty W. Merkley, this powerful work will be presented twice (Saturday, July 25, and Saturday, Aug. 15) through a grand-scale collaboration of the Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra, Charlotte Ballet, Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus, Rochester Oratorio Society and Chautauqua School of Dance. Carmina follows The Romeo & Juliet Project (2013) and Go West! (2014) in an ongoing initiative to feature many or all of Chautauqua’s resident arts programs together in major productions.

The CSO also continues its commitment to new music and interdisciplinary work in 2015 by debuting a Chautauqua Institution-commissioned piece for orchestra, solo violin, solo spoken word and boys’ narrative chorus. “Meditations on Raising Boys,” premiering Thursday, July 9, is a collaboration between composer/violinist Daniel Bernard Roumain and spoken word artist Marc Bamuthi Joseph. Featured as both creators and soloists for the work, these two artists will be in residence for the week of July 4–11, themed “Boys Will Be Boys, Then Men.”

For more details about the Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra’s 2015 season, please see the attached full repertoire listing.

The Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra was founded in 1929 and today continues its legacy as the center of musical life at Chautauqua Institution. Performing 22 concerts in the Amphitheater including two concerts accompanying Chautauqua Dance, and two productions in collaboration with Chautauqua Opera, the CSO is a tenured union orchestra that draws its membership from around the nation and around the world. It has grown from its original complement of 52 musicians to the current roster of 74 active members.

The pre-eminent expression of lifelong learning in the United States, Chautauqua Institution comes alive each summer with a unique mix of fine and performing arts, lectures, interfaith worship and programs, and recreational activities. Over the course of nine weeks, more than 100,000 people visit Chautauqua and participate in programs, classes and community events for all ages — all within the beautiful setting of a historic lakeside village. Smithsonian magazine named Chautauqua as the No. 1 “Best Small Town to Visit in 2014” in the cover story of its April 2014 issue.





CONTACT: Joe Newberry, 919.789.5484
jnewberry@ncsymphony.org
Find press releases and downloadable photos at
ncsymphony.org/media/

North Carolina Symphony Accepting Nominations
for Maxine Swalin Award for Outstanding Music Educator

The North Carolina Symphony is accepting nominations for the 2015 Maxine Swalin Award for Outstanding Music Educator now through Wednesday, April 8.

North Carolina students, parents, colleagues and community members can recommend their local music teacher for the Award, which celebrates a North Carolina music teacher who makes a lasting difference in the lives of students, serves the community in an exemplary manner as a role model in music education, instills a love for music in children and inspires students to reach appropriately high musical standards.

Go to www.ncsymphony.org/educationprograms , then to "Student Performances, Competitions & Awards," and click on "Maxine Swalin Award for Outstanding Musical Educator" to complete a nomination and to submit at least three supporting recommendations from students, colleagues and/or members of the community. For more information, contact Symphony Director of Education Sarah Gilpin at sgilpin@ncsymphony.org, or (919) 789-5461.

The Award, which includes a $1,000 recognition, is in honor of Maxine Swalin, wife of Dr. Benjamin Swalin, North Carolina Symphony music director from 1939 to 1972. Together they lobbied for the passage of North Carolina Senate Bill No. 248, "The Horn Tootin' Bill," providing state financial support for the Symphony's education program, and in 1945 established the children's concert division of the Symphony. Nearly 70 years later, the North Carolina Symphony's education program remains one of the finest and most extensive in the country, bringing free live symphonic music to school children across the state.

In 2009, the Symphony created a new prize, the Jackson Parkhurst Award for Special Achievement, to be granted in the years in which a strong second candidate for the Swalin Award demands recognition. The prize, which includes a $500 recognition, is named after the Symphony's former director of education, in honor of his longstanding service to the students of North Carolina. One application applies to both awards.

Marshall Butler, Jr. the choral director at Sanderson High School in Raleigh, N.C., and Aram Bryan, Director of Programs for the Community School of the Arts in Charlotte, N.C., were last year's winners of the Swalin and Parkhurst Awards, respectively.

For complete information on the Symphony's music education offerings for young students, adult learners and teachers, visit www.ncsymphony.org/educationprograms.

About the North Carolina Symphony

Founded in 1932, the North Carolina Symphony performs over 175 concerts annually to adults and school children in more than 50 North Carolina counties. An entity of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, the orchestra employs 66 professional musicians, under the artistic leadership of Music Director and Conductor Grant Llewellyn, Resident Conductor William Henry Curry, and Associate Conductor David Glover.

Headquartered in downtown Raleigh's spectacular Meymandi Concert Hall at the Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts and an outdoor summer venue at Booth Amphitheatre in Cary, N.C., the Symphony performs about 60 concerts annually in the Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill and Cary metropolitan area. It holds regular concert series in Fayetteville, New Bern, Southern Pines and Wilmington-as well as individual concerts in many other North Carolina communities throughout the year-and conducts one of the most extensive education programs of any U.S. orchestra.





FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MEDIA CONTACT:
Elizabeth Parker
February 9, 2015
919 787-8452

CAROLINA BALLET CELEBRATES MASTER COMPOSERS AND THEIR MUSIC FOR DANCE

Music of Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Stravinsky among Names on Program

RALEIGH, NC — After the success of Robert Weiss’ Vivaldi’s Four Seasons in February 2014, Carolina Ballet decided to present a program of dance by famous composers through the ages. The Master Composers program is a retrospective of music and dance from the middle ages to the 20th century choreographed by Robert Weiss and Choreographer in Residence Zalman Raffael. It will be presented March 5-22, 2015 at the Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Raleigh. The schedule of performances is as follows:

  • Thursday, March 5 at 8pm
  • Friday, March 6 at 8pm
  • Saturday, March 7, 14 & 21 at 2:00 & 8:00pm
  • Sunday, March 8, 15 & 22 at 2:00pm

Artistic Director Robert Weiss asked his marketing team do a little research to find out why the Vivaldi program did so well with ticket sales last season. The response was overwhelmingly due to the familiarity of the music and recognition of Vivaldi’s name. This information spurred Mr. Weiss to think about other music by famous composers that would attract the same amount of enthusiasm. After spending the entire summer of 2014 researching and listening to music composed specifically for dance by such great composers as Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Stravinsky, Chopin, Tchaikovsky and others, he began to formulate a plan for the Master Composers program. Working with Zalman Raffael, they selected music that would trace the evolution of dance from the 15th century to today.

With the exception of the opening and the closing sections of the program, the music and dances are presented in chronological order. The program opens with a Polonaise by Chopin and closes with the Waltz from Eugene Onegin by Tchaikovsky. Both of these sections are large in scope, using all the dancers on the program and are choreographed by Robert Weiss. Other music on the program includes Hungarian Dances by Brahms, German Dances by Mozart and Stravinsky’s Tango. Weiss admits that this has been an ambitious project but he says that he might eventually like to present a Master Composer’s II as he found so much music to pull from. Ticket prices for Master Composers range from $26.69-$72.59 (price includes sales tax) and may be purchased through the Carolina Ballet box office at 919 719-0900 or by calling Ticketmaster at 800 982-2787 or online at www.ticketmaster.com. Student tickets are available at the theatre half an hour before the show for $16.01.

Carolina Ballet, Inc. has rapidly taken its place among America’s premier arts organizations. Under the innovative direction of artistic director Robert Weiss, with a talented company, and fiscally responsible management and community support, Carolina Ballet exposes audiences to traditional ballet by legendary masters and new works of contemporary choreographers. This seventeenth season represents the vibrant entrepreneurial spirit and ever- increasing quality of life experienced here in North Carolina.





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MEDIA CONTACT:
Teresa Eaton
410.783.8024
teaton@BSOmusic.org



Baltimore Symphony Youth Orchestra and OrchKids Collaborate for a Special Concert at The Kennedy Center's Millennium Stage, February 6th


Baltimore, Md. (January 21, 2015) The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is excited to announce a special collaborative concert with its flagship community education program, OrchKids and its Youth Orchestra, on the world renowned Millennium Stage at The Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. on Friday, February 6th from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m.  Under leadership of OrchKids Artistic Director Dan Trahey, Bucket Band Director Brian Prechtl, BSYO Conductor  Mary Poling and OrchKids Conductor Eli Wirth, 65 children, spanning pre-kindergarten through ninth grade, will perform together for a special concert that will feature a mix of classical, jazz, pop and spiritual-inspired pieces. The ensemble will be accompanied by Chi-chi Nwanoku, Principal Double Bass and a founding member of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment and Endymion Ensemble, on the orchestral version of Rihanna's Stay.

As part of the Kennedy Center's "Performing Arts for Everyone" initiative, visitors can enjoy free local, national, and international artists on the Millennium Stage, which is located indoors in the Kennedy Center's Grand Foyer. No tickets are required, though seating is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis.

The BSO education programs have a history of receiving national recognition. Recently, in November of 2013, OrchKids was a recipient of a 2013 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award, the signature program of the President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities.

This event marks another highlight of the accomplishments that our education programs have made over the years, said BSO VP of Education and Community Engagement Carol Bogash.  First because this is the largest collaboration of our BSYO and OrchKids programs that we have ever had, but also because they will be playing to a national audience at one of the most prestigious venues in the country. This experience provides lessons beyond music education. It helps to enhance the students self-esteem, shows the impact of hard work, and proves that anything is possible when you put your mind to it!”

About OrchKids

OrchKids is a year-round during- and after-school music program designed to create social change and nurture promising futures for youth in Baltimore City neighborhoods. In partnership with the Baltimore City Public School system, OrchKids provides students with instruments, academic instruction, positive role models, field trips, daily healthy meals and more. Marking its seventh year in 2014-2015, OrchKids serves 825 students spanning pre-kindergarten through ninth grades across five Title I schools in West and East Baltimore.

Under Music Director Marin Alsop's artistic leadership and direction, OrchKids is a cornerstone of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's efforts to expand the Orchestra’s relevance within the City's broad and diverse community. In 2008, Maestra Alsop directed $100,000 of her MacArthur Genius Prize as seed money to launch the program, and remains an active participant as a mentor to the students, in joint public performances, and in advancing community and funding partnerships. Extraordinary sustaining support for the OrchKids program is provided by Robert E. Meyerhoff & Rheda Becker. In November 2013, OrchKids was awarded a National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award.

About the Baltimore Symphony Youth Orchestras
Under Artistic Director Ken Lam, the Baltimore Symphony Youth Orchestras (BSYO) comprises three orchestral ensembles of 210 elementary, middle and high school students from across Maryland and Pennsylvania. Students commit to weekly rehearsals and have opportunities to collaborate with and be mentored by BSO musicians and Music Director Marin Alsop, including side-by-side rehearsals with the BSO, coaching from BSO musicians, master classes with world renowned artists, intensive chamber music classes and performance opportunities, and access to exclusive BSYO events at the Meyerhoff. The BSYO serves as ensemble-in-residence at the state-of-the-art George Washington Carver Center for Arts and Technology in Towson, Maryland.

Chi-chi Nwanoku
Chi-chi Nwanoku studied at the Royal Academy of Music and with Franco Petracchi in Rome. She has become one of England’s most sought after double bass players, and has developed a worldwide reputation as one of the finest exponents on her instrument today.

Her first professional position was as Principal double bass with the London Mozart Players, and since then she has performed and recorded as principal and soloist with many of Europe's prestigious chamber orchestras and ensembles. These include the Academy of St Martin’s-in-the-Fields, English Baroque Soloists, London Classical Players and the Orchestre Revolutionnaire et Romantique.

She is Principal Double Bass and a founder member of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment and Endymion Ensemble, is Professor of Double Bass Historical Studies at The Royal Academy of Music, and gives Master classes as a visiting Professor at Conservatoires worldwide.

She was featured as a soloist on a BBC 2 television series ˜Strings, Bows and Bellows™, and Channel 4 television's ‘Shooting Stars™ in 1994/5. She presents a weekly program Radio Three Requests on BBC Radio 3 every Sunday 2-4pm. Chi-chi was a jury member of ˜Classical Star™, featured on BBC 2 TV in 2007. Her extensive discography includes three recordings of Schubert's ˜Trout™ Quintet, with Domus, Hausmusik and Trio Fontennay with Nabuko Imai (viola), for Virgin, EMI and Teldec respectively. There are also recordings of the Schubert Octet, Beethoven Septet, Rossini String Sonatas (a Quattro) and Boccherini cello sonatas (with Richard Lester/Hyperion).

She has made many symphonic recordings as orchestral principal.  In October 2000 Hyperion label released Chi-chiâ's first solo recording to critical acclaim. This includes three double bass concertos by Vanhal and Dittersdorf, with the Swedish Chamber Orchestra; Hyperion CD 67179.

COMPLETE EVENT DETAILS

Friday, February 6, 2015”The Millennium Stage, The Kennedy Center, Washington, D.C.

OrchKids

                Dan Trahey, Artistic Director

                Brian Prectl, Bucket Band Director

                Eli Worth, Conductor

Baltimore Symphony Youth Orchestras

                Mary Poling, Conductor

Chi-Chi Nwanoku, Principle Double Bass

Admission is free and open to the public, though space is limited.

The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is funded by an operating grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency dedicated to cultivating a vibrant cultural community where the arts thrive. 

The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is supported in part by funding from the Montgomery County government and the Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County. 

The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is also supported by the Citizens of Baltimore County and Baltimore City.
 





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Moore Philharmonic Orchestra August 18, 2014
125 Pecan Grove Drive
Aberdeen, NC 28315
Email: moorephilorch@aol.com
Website: www.mporchestra.com
Information: (910) 944-3452 (voice mail)
Moore Philharmonic Orchestra Celebrates TENTH Season!

The Moore Philharmonic Orchestra is pleased to announce its tenth concert season. The first concert will be the fall concert on October 16 at Owens Auditorium on the campus of Sandhills Community College featuring selections from our first season in 2005. The annual holiday concert follows on December 6th at Pinecrest High School. The annual spring concert will be April 25, 2015 at Owens Auditorium. We will replicate the spring concert on May 17, 2015 at Trinity United Methodist Church in Troy. The Orchestra will also perform in support of the Festival of Trees (November 22, 1pm) and the Moore Chamber of Commerce Annual Dinner (February 2015). All concerts are free of charge, but tax-deductible donations are always welcome.

The Moore Philharmonic provides the opportunity for advancing students (8th grade and above) to perform in a full orchestra setting alongside experienced adult musicians. Rehearsals are every Thursday starting August 28 in Wellard Hall at Sandhills Community College from 6:30 pm to 8:15 pm. Open rehearsals will last through September for students and adults who are interested in finding out more about being a member. Seating is available in all sections. The Moore Philharmonic is an all-volunteer organization; no fees are required to participate. High School and college students who qualify have the opportunity to earn course credits toward their education. The Orchestra works at perfecting and performing enjoyable yet challenging music.

Since 2005, the Orchestra has served the Sandhills community supporting music education and appreciation. It provides an outlet for approximately 50 volunteer musicians to perform varied programs of orchestral literature while expanding their musical experience. Members include adults and talented college, high school and middle school students. It is a non-profit 501c(3) organization and relies on individual and business contributions to cover operating and general expenses and to support a robust scholarship fund benefitting Moore County music students. The Orchestra is a member of the Moore County Arts Council and the Moore County Chamber of Commerce.

For more information, visit the Moore Philharmonic Orchestra website at www.mporchestra.com or on FaceBook.

The Moore Philharmonic Orchestra - your hometown community orchestra helping develop students for the world’s stages.

Moore Philharmonic Orchestra July 2, 2014

125 Pecan Grove Drive

Aberdeen, NC 28315

Email: moorephilorch@aol.com

Website: www.mporchestra.com

Information: (910) 944-3452 (voice mail)


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Moore Philharmonic Orchestra announces scholarship winners


The Moore Philharmonic Orchestra is pleased to announce seven scholarship winners for 2014:


Emily Beaulieu of Seven Lakes North (a home-schooled rising 11th grader)

Caitlin Blue of West End (attends Pinecrest HS where she is a rising 10th grader)

Charlotte Cox of Southern Pines (a home-schooled rising 9th grader)

Erin Long of Vass (attends Union Pines HS where she is a rising 10th grader)

Kyle Osterman of Southern Pines (attends Pinecrest HS where he is a rising 10th grader)

Emma Short of Carthage (attends Union Pines HS where she is a rising 11th grader)

Megan Swanke of Pinehurst (attends Pinecrest HS where she is a rising 11th grader)


Congratulations to all seven! These scholarships were presented at the Moore Philharmonic’s Spring concert.


Since 2005, the Orchestra has served the Sandhills community supporting music appreciation and education. It provides an outlet for approximately 50 volunteer musicians to perform varied programs of orchestral literature. Members include experienced adults and talented college, high school and middle school students. It is a non-profit 501c(3) organization and relies on individual and business contributions to help cover operating and general expenses and to support a scholarship fund benefitting Moore County music students. The Orchestra is a member of the Moore County Arts Council, the Moore County Chamber of Commerce and the League of American Orchestras.



For more information, visit the Moore Philharmonic Orchestra website at www.mporchestra.com or on FaceBook.


The Moore Philharmonic Orchestra - your hometown community orchestra helping develop students for the world’s stages.

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The Metropolitan Opera Announces the 2014-15 Season

February 12, 2014

The Met’s 2014-15 Season Will Feature 26 Operas, Including Three Met Premieres, In Six New Productions and 18 Revivals

The season includes the first-ever Met performances of John Adams’s The Death of Klinghoffer, Rossini’s La Donna del Lago, and Tchaikovsky’s Iolanta

Met Music Director James Levine leads six operas this season, including the opening night new production of Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro, directed by Richard Eyre, premiering on September 22

On New Year’s Eve, Susan Stroman makes her Met debut directing a new production of Lehár’s The Merry Widow, with Renée Fleming in the title role and Andrew Davis conducting

Two double bills of one-act operas receive new productions this season: Iolanta, with Anna Netrebko in the title role, and Bartók’s Duke Bluebeard’s Castle, conducted by Valery Gergiev and directed by Mariusz Trelinski, premieres January 26, 2015

Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana and Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci, conducted by Met Principal Conductor Fabio Luisi and directed by David McVicar, receives its first new Met production in 45 years on April 14, 2015

The ninth season of The Met: Live in HD will feature 10 live transmissions, beginning October 11 with Verdi’s Macbeth, starring Anna Netrebko as Lady Macbeth

New York, NY—The Metropolitan Opera’s 2014-15 season will feature 26 operas, three of them company premieres, in six new productions and 18 revivals showcasing the talents of the world’s leading singers, conductors, and theater artists. The three operas that will have their first-ever Met performances, each staged by a director making his Met debut, are John Adams’s The Death of Klinghoffer, conducted by David Robertson and directed by Tom Morris, opening October 20; Rossini’s La Donna del Lago, conducted by Michele Mariotti and directed by Paul Curran, opening February 16, 2015; and Tchaikovsky’s one-act opera Iolanta, conducted by Valery Gergiev and directed by Mariusz Trelinski. Iolanta will be presented in a double bill with a new staging of Bartók’s one-act Duke Bluebeard’s Castle, also conducted by Gergiev and directed by Trelinski.

Met Music Director James Levine, back to full strength, will resume his typical schedule of six operas in the 2014-15 season. His first opera will be Richard Eyre’s new production of Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro, which opens the Met season on September 22. Levine also conducts five revivals next season, leading Offenbach’s Les Contes d’Hoffmann; Stravinsky’s The Rake’s Progress; Verdi’s Ernani, which he has not conducted at the Met since 1983, and Un Ballo in Maschera; and Wagner’s Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. Levine will also conduct all three concerts in the MET Orchestra at Carnegie Hall series.

On New Year’s Eve, Tony Award-winning director Susan Stroman will make her Met debut with a new production of Lehár’s The Merry Widow, conducted by Andrew Davis. The final new production of the season will be another double bill, Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana and Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci, led by Met Principal Conductor Fabio Luisi and directed by David McVicar.

The 2014-15 season was announced by Met General Manager Peter Gelb and Met Music Director James Levine.

“With a mix of new offerings, a few repertory rarities, and solid casting of our mainstay revivals, this should prove to be a stimulating season for the Company and for our audience,” said Gelb. “Jim’s return to a full slate of operas is the ideal icing on our cake.”

“My return to the company has been one of the most joyful experiences of my life, and I’m delighted to resume a full working schedule of six operas next season for the first time in several years,” said James Levine.

The ninth season of The Met: Live in HD, which is the world’s leading alternative cinema content series and currently reaches more than 2,000 theaters in 65 countries, will open on October 11 with Verdi’s Macbeth. The performance, conducted by Fabio Luisi, will star Željko Lucic as Macbeth and Anna Netrebko in the vocally and dramatically demanding role of Lady Macbeth. Nine additional matinee performances, including all six new productions, will be transmitted over the course of the season.

For additional information, please click here!





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Polskin Arts & Communications Counselors
212-593-5889
sprengerm@finnpartners.com
Vice President of External Relations & Communication
Vanessa Leitman
305-377-1140
vleitman@youngarts.org
Media Contacts:
Megan V. Sprenger Vice President of External Relations & Communication

National YoungArts Foundation Announces 2014 YoungArts Winners

Yong-hun Kim of Chapel Hill, North Carolina is a YoungArts Honorable Mention Winner in Music (Violin)

MIAMI, FL (December, 23, 2013) – Yong-hun Kim of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, who hails from Deerfield Academy, is a National YoungArts Foundation Honorable Mention Winner in Music (Violin). Out of approximately 11,000 applications from students in ten disciplines across the literary, performing, visual and design arts fields, Yong-hun has been recognized for his outstanding work and accomplishments. A complete list of this year’s 687 Winners is available online at this link.

“Every year I look forward to reviewing our applications because each one is so inspiring,” stated Paul T. Lehr, President & CEO of the National YoungArts Foundation. “I congratulate all 687 Winners who are incredibly talented and are who we consider to be the most promising young artists in America today.” YoungArts Winners are designated into three categories–Finalist, Honorable Mention and Merit–and are selected through a blind adjudication process. Honorable Mention award Winners receive at least $250 and along with all 2014 Winners are eligible to participate in the Emmy-nominated HBO series YoungArts MasterClass and in YoungArts’ regional programs–YoungArts Miami (February 12-17, 2014), YoungArts Los Angeles (March 18-23, 2014) and YoungArts New York (March 31-April 6, 2014)–space permitting. During these life-changing experiences, participants will take intense master classes and workshops with internationally renowned artists and will have the opportunity to present their work to the public.

All Winners receive a certificate of achievement, a recommendation letter, and the choice to be added to the YoungArts Student List Service (SLS). If added, their information will be sent to participating colleges, universities and professional schools. These schools have expressed interest in identifying young artists they may offer opportunities for admission and/or financial aid, and may be in touch with Winners regarding scholarship opportunities.

Winners also become part of the YoungArts alumni network of 17,000 artists, some of whom have gone on to become leading professionals in their fields including actresses Vanessa Williams, Viola Davis, and Kerry Washington; actor, musician, and filmmaker Adrian Grenier; four-time Tony Award nominee Raúl Esparza; CEO of American Ballet Theatre Rachel Moore; recording artists Nicki Minaj, Chris Young and Josh Groban; Metropolitan Opera star Eric Owens; musicians Terence Blanchard and Jennifer Koh; choreographer Desmond Richardson; visual artist Hernan Bas; and internationally acclaimed multimedia artist Doug Aitken. YoungArts maintains a relationship with its alumni by integrating them into national programs and local events, supporting their projects and seeking ways to promote their artistic ideas and establish connections for them with YoungArts’ partners around the country.

YoungArts is the exclusive nominating agency for the U.S. Presidential Scholars in the Arts, the highest honor that can be awarded to any artistically talented graduating high school senior. Every year YoungArts nominates 60 YoungArts Winners to the White House appointed Commission on Presidential Scholars, 20 of whom are then selected to become U.S. Presidential Scholars in the Arts.

About the National YoungArts Foundation

The National YoungArts Foundation (formerly known as the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts) was established in 1981 by Lin and Ted Arison to identify and nurture the next generation of artists in the literary, performing, visual and design arts, and to contribute to the cultural vitality of the nation by supporting the artistic development of talented young artists. Each year, YoungArts receives approximately 11,000 applications from 15-18 year old (or grades 10-12) artists. From this pool, approximately 700 winners are selected and are eligible to participate in YoungArts programs in Miami, New York and Los Angeles. YoungArts provides these emerging artists with life-changing experiences with renowned mentors, access to significant scholarships, national recognition, and other opportunities throughout their careers to help ensure that the nation’s most outstanding emerging artists are encouraged to pursue careers in the arts.

To date, YoungArts has honored more than 17,000 young artists with over $6 million in monetary awards; facilitated in excess of $150 million in college scholarship opportunities; and enabled its participants to work with master teachers who are among the most distinguished artists in the world, such as Mikhail Baryshnikov, Jacques d'Amboise, Plácido Domingo, Frank Gehry, Bill T. Jones, Quincy Jones, Robert Redford and Martin Scorsese. In addition, at the request of the Commission on Presidential Scholars, which is appointed by the President of the United States, YoungArts serves as the exclusive nominating agency for the U.S. Presidential Scholars in the Arts, the country's highest honor for young artists. Presidential Scholars in the Arts receive a Presidential Medal and perform at the Kennedy Center and exhibit at the Smithsonian.

Some of YoungArts’ work is featured in its Emmy nominated HBO series YoungArts MasterClass, which chronicles the work of renowned artists sharing their art and life experiences with YoungArts Winners. Season 1 featured Edward Albee, Jacques d’Amboise, Plácido Domingo, Olafur Eliasson, Frank Gehry, Bill T. Jones, Julian Schnabel, Michael Tilson Thomas, and Liv Ullmann. Season 2 featured Renée Fleming, John Guare, Patti LuPone, Bobby McFerrin, James Rosenquist, Kathleen Turner and Bruce Weber. Season 3 will include, among others, Wynton Marsalis, Anna Deavere Smith, Alan Alda, Josh Groban, Joshua Bell, and Robert Redford. In conjunction with Columbia University’s Teachers College, YoungArts also has developed a Study Guide based on its YoungArts MasterClass series, which is distributed free to schools nationwide to help increase arts education and awareness.

In order to carry on expanded activities locally in Miami and across the country, YoungArts is working with world-renowned architect and YoungArts Artistic Advisor Frank Gehry to transform the former Bacardi Tower and Museum buildings and three and a half acre campus into its national headquarters and support expanded local activities in Miami, FL. The new campus will be a multidisciplinary arts complex with a new Gehry-designed performing arts center and park with state-of-the-art sound and video capabilities. The campus is beginning to host year-round programming including master classes, public screenings and performances, artists in residence throughout the year, and visual arts exhibitions guest curated by institutions based in Miami, New York, and Los Angeles. For more information, visit www.youngarts.org. Select this link to see a brief video about YoungArts.





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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2013
CONTACT: Suzanne Rousso, Artistic Director
office: 919/560-2701 | cell: 919/413-3120 | suzanne@mallarmemusic.org

MALLARMÉ CHAMBER PLAYERS ANNOUNCE THE FIRST CONCERT OF 2013-14 (THE 30TH) CONCERT SEASON: WEILL AND WILDER SONGBOOK

Durham, NC (August 22, 2013) – The Mallarmé Chamber Players will be presenting the Triangle's own cabaret singer, Ellen Ciompi, who will entertain with a program of art songs from the 1930s through the ‘60s presented in a cabaret style. Mrs. Ciompi will be joined by keyboardist Glenn Mehrbach, bassist Robbie Link and clarinetist Fred Jacobowitz to present Weill and Wilder Songbook on Sunday, September 15th, at 3:00 pm at the Front Room at the Cookery in Durham.

Although “Mack the Knife” is perhaps the best-known song composer Kurt Weill wrote, there are an enormous amount of entertaining, witty songs written by Weill both before and after he emigrated from Germany to the United States. Mrs. Ciompi will sing a variety of his songs including “Pirate Jenny” (lyrics by Bertolt Brecht from The Threepenny Opera) and “Tschaikowsky and Other Russians,” first sang by Danny Kaye in 1941 with lyrics by Ira Gershwin.

American composer Alec Wilder, who was known mostly for several popular songs he wrote in the 1940s like “I’ll Be Around,” effectively bridged the worlds of classical and popular music by also writing successful operas, ballets, movie-music and instrumental works. Clarinetist Fred Jacobowitz and pianist Glenn Mehrbach will present his jazz-infused Sonata for Clarinet and Piano from 1963 on the program. Mrs. Ciompi will also sing songs by Wilder, written for and first performed by artists like Frank Sinatra, Mabel Mercer, Peggy Lee and Tony Bennett.

The Front Room at the Cookery in Durham will serve as the perfect backdrop for this cabaret-style concert. Concert-goers are invited to a post-performance reception with champagne and birthday cake from Details Cake Design to celebrate the start of Mallarmé’s 30th concert season!

TICKETS: $25 in advance, $30 at the door | $20 K-12 educators, $10 students with ID at the door

Season subscription flex packages are also on sale through Sunday, September 15; individual tickets for all 2013-14 series concerts are available throughout the season by either calling the Mallarmé office at 919/560-2788 or ordering online at www.mallarmemusic.org/concerts.html. Full details for ordering tickets can be found on Mallarmé Chamber Players’ website: www.mallarmemusic.org.

MALLARMÉ CHAMBER PLAYERS 30TH SEASON – Co-produced by George Chandler

Sunday, September 15, 2013 at 3:00 PM | WEILL AND WILDER SONGBOOK
The Front Room at the Cookery – 1011 West Chapel Hill Street, Durham
$25 in advance, $30 at the door | $20 K-12 educators | $10 students

PROGRAM

Kurt Weill: "I'm a Stranger Here Myself"
"Pirate Jenny"
"Youkali Tango"
"Nanna's Lied"
"It Never Was You"
"Tchaikowsky and Other Russians"
"September Song"
"That's Him”
"The Song of the Soldier's Wife”
"How Much I Love You”

Alec Wilder: "Lovers & Losers"
"I'll Be Around"
"I See It Now"
"Blackberry Winter"
"Walk Pretty"
"Did You Ever Cross Over to Sneden's?"
"Trouble Is a Man"

Ray Jessell – "That Old Kurt Weill Song"

Alec Wilder – Sonata for Clarinet and Piano

ARTISTS
Ellen Ciompi – soprano, Glenn Mehrbach – piano, Robbie Link – bass, Fred Jacobowitz – clarinet
TICKETS: www.mallarmemusic.org/concerts.html or 919/560-2788

ABOUT MALLARMÉ CHAMBER PLAYERS

The Mallarmé Chamber Players are a flexible ensemble of professional musicians based in Durham, North Carolina, whose mission is to enrich the lives of their community through outstanding chamber music. The ensemble distinguishes itself by its innovative educational programs, its commitment to creative collaboration with other organizations, its creation of significant new work and its dedication to serve a diverse population.

Mallarmé annually presents a series of five concerts that features great, diverse, and multidisciplinary chamber music. Mallarmé performs everything from Bach with period instruments to brand new works. In this past year alone, Mallarmé has presented two world premières by composers Gwyneth Walker and Katrina Wreede. In 2010, Mallarmé released a cd on Albany/Videmus records of chamber music by African American composers to great acclaim.

Mallarmé is a nonprofit, tax-exempt, 501(c)(3) organization. The 2013-14 concert season is made possible in part by grants from the Durham Arts Council’s Annual Arts Fund, the North Carolina Arts Council and Target.





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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2013
CONTACT: Suzanne Rousso, Artistic Director
office: 919/560-2701 | cell: 919/413-3120 | suzanne@mallarmemusic.org

MALLARMÉ CHAMBER PLAYERS ANNOUNCE THE FIRST CONCERT OF 2013-14 (THE 30TH) CONCERT SEASON: WEILL AND WILDER SONGBOOK

Durham, NC (August 22, 2013) – The Mallarmé Chamber Players will be presenting the Triangle's own cabaret singer, Ellen Ciompi, who will entertain with a program of art songs from the 1930s through the ‘60s presented in a cabaret style. Mrs. Ciompi will be joined by keyboardist Glenn Mehrbach, bassist Robbie Link and clarinetist Fred Jacobowitz to present Weill and Wilder Songbook on Sunday, September 15th, at 3:00 pm at the Front Room at the Cookery in Durham.

Although “Mack the Knife” is perhaps the best-known song composer Kurt Weill wrote, there are an enormous amount of entertaining, witty songs written by Weill both before and after he emigrated from Germany to the United States. Mrs. Ciompi will sing a variety of his songs including “Pirate Jenny” (lyrics by Bertolt Brecht from The Threepenny Opera) and “Tschaikowsky and Other Russians,” first sang by Danny Kaye in 1941 with lyrics by Ira Gershwin.

American composer Alec Wilder, who was known mostly for several popular songs he wrote in the 1940s like “I’ll Be Around,” effectively bridged the worlds of classical and popular music by also writing successful operas, ballets, movie-music and instrumental works. Clarinetist Fred Jacobowitz and pianist Glenn Mehrbach will present his jazz-infused Sonata for Clarinet and Piano from 1963 on the program. Mrs. Ciompi will also sing songs by Wilder, written for and first performed by artists like Frank Sinatra, Mabel Mercer, Peggy Lee and Tony Bennett.

The Front Room at the Cookery in Durham will serve as the perfect backdrop for this cabaret-style concert. Concert-goers are invited to a post-performance reception with champagne and birthday cake from Details Cake Design to celebrate the start of Mallarmé’s 30th concert season!

TICKETS: $25 in advance, $30 at the door | $20 K-12 educators, $10 students with ID at the door

Season subscription flex packages are also on sale through Sunday, September 15; individual tickets for all 2013-14 series concerts are available throughout the season by either calling the Mallarmé office at 919/560-2788 or ordering online at www.mallarmemusic.org/concerts.html. Full details for ordering tickets can be found on Mallarmé Chamber Players’ website: www.mallarmemusic.org.

MALLARMÉ CHAMBER PLAYERS 30TH SEASON – Co-produced by George Chandler

Sunday, September 15, 2013 at 3:00 PM | WEILL AND WILDER SONGBOOK
The Front Room at the Cookery – 1011 West Chapel Hill Street, Durham
$25 in advance, $30 at the door | $20 K-12 educators | $10 students

PROGRAM

Kurt Weill: "I'm a Stranger Here Myself"
"Pirate Jenny"
"Youkali Tango"
"Nanna's Lied"
"It Never Was You"
"Tchaikowsky and Other Russians"
"September Song"
"That's Him”
"The Song of the Soldier's Wife”
"How Much I Love You”

Alec Wilder: "Lovers & Losers"
"I'll Be Around"
"I See It Now"
"Blackberry Winter"
"Walk Pretty"
"Did You Ever Cross Over to Sneden's?"
"Trouble Is a Man"

Ray Jessell – "That Old Kurt Weill Song"

Alec Wilder – Sonata for Clarinet and Piano

ARTISTS
Ellen Ciompi – soprano, Glenn Mehrbach – piano, Robbie Link – bass, Fred Jacobowitz – clarinet
TICKETS: www.mallarmemusic.org/concerts.html or 919/560-2788

ABOUT MALLARMÉ CHAMBER PLAYERS

The Mallarmé Chamber Players are a flexible ensemble of professional musicians based in Durham, North Carolina, whose mission is to enrich the lives of their community through outstanding chamber music. The ensemble distinguishes itself by its innovative educational programs, its commitment to creative collaboration with other organizations, its creation of significant new work and its dedication to serve a diverse population.

Mallarmé annually presents a series of five concerts that features great, diverse, and multidisciplinary chamber music. Mallarmé performs everything from Bach with period instruments to brand new works. In this past year alone, Mallarmé has presented two world premières by composers Gwyneth Walker and Katrina Wreede. In 2010, Mallarmé released a cd on Albany/Videmus records of chamber music by African American composers to great acclaim.

Mallarmé is a nonprofit, tax-exempt, 501(c)(3) organization. The 2013-14 concert season is made possible in part by grants from the Durham Arts Council’s Annual Arts Fund, the North Carolina Arts Council and Target.





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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Parker
July 1, 2013
919 747-8452

CAROLINA BALLET PRINICPAL DANCERS TO PERFORM IN BELGIUM

RALEIGH, NC --- Carolina Ballet is pleased to announce that principal dancers Margaret Severin-Hansen and Gabor Kapin have been invited to perform with the Royal Ballet of Flanders in Antwerp, Belgium for the 2013-2014 season. “This is a great honor for these two wonderful dancers and a coup for the company,” says artistic director Robert Weiss. “It will be an excellent experience for them to showcase their talent on the international stage.” Severin-Hansen and Kapin will remain members of Carolina Ballet and return to the Triangle to perform principal roles throughout the company’s upcoming 16th season.

Margaret Severin-Hansen is a founding member of Carolina Ballet. She was hired as an apprentice from the School of American Ballet in New York City in 1998. She quickly became a member of the corps de ballet and rose through the ranks to principal dancer in only a number of years. At Carolina Ballet she has danced the premier roles for a ballerina in the classical ballet repertoire – Giselle, La Sylphide, Sleeping Beauty, Coppelia, Swan Lake, Romeo and Juliet, Nutcracker to name just a few. She has also danced many lead roles in the ballets of George Balanchine, and in October 2013 she will dance the female lead in Rubies on Carolina Ballet’s Balanchine program that opens the season.

Gabor Kapin arrived at Carolina Ballet at the beginning of the company’s second season from the Hungarian National Ballet as a member of the corps de ballet. After rising to the rank of soloist, Kapin took a leave of absence from the company in the fall of 2005 to join Boston Ballet; he returned to Carolina Ballet as a principal dancer in 2008. He has danced the majority of the lead male roles in the company’s repertory including the lead in Messiah which he will reprise in November over Thanksgiving weekend, dancing with Margaret Severin-Hansen as the Angel in Raleigh Memorial Auditorium. Kapin and Severin-Hansen were married in 2008. After fifteen seasons, Carolina Ballet, Inc. is firmly established among America’s premier arts organizations. Under the innovative direction of artistic director Robert Weiss, a talented company, fiscally responsible management and community support, Carolina Ballet continues to expose audiences to traditional ballet by legendary masters and new works of contemporary choreographers. The company reflects the vibrant entrepreneurial spirit and ever-increasing quality of life experienced in North Carolina.





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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

LONG LEAF OPERA TAKES IT FINAL BOW WITH FREE TWO-DAY FESTIVAL MARCH 16-17, 2013

Master Class, Recital and World Premiere Honor Company & Late Co-Founder Randolph Umberger
Media Contact: Richard C. Wall (919) 942-0972
richardcookwall@gmail.com
www.longleafopera.org
https://www.facebook.com/LongLeafOperaVocalFestival

Long Leaf Opera Vocal Festival

DURHAM NC February 25, 2013 -After 16 years of producing American Opera in the Triangle and winning national recognition and merit, Long Leaf Opera is taking its last bows with the Long Leaf Opera Vocal Festival, a free two-day event featuring a master class, a recital and full-length world premiere opera and post-performance serenade to Long Leaf's co-founders on Saturday and Sunday, March 16-17, 2013 at Kenan Auditorium, Durham Academy. Produced by local musician and choral director Richard C. Wall, the two-day affair will include a series of free events:

Saturday, March 16: Master Class

At 10:00am, a Master Class for Singers features Masters Mary Gayle Greene of Appalachian State, Timothy Sparks, UNC Chapel Hill, Broadway Music Directors Mark Hartman (Avenue Q and Sondheim on Sondheim and current Musical Director of Carolina Playmakers' Cabaret) and Steven Tyler (Jane Eyre, Guys and Dolls and The Producers). Singers will participate in a roundtable discussion with the masters on their presentation, vocal abilities and will receive encouragement to continue careers in singing.
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Sunday, March 17: Recital and World Premiere Opera

At 3:00pm, a recital by JoAna Rusche, mezzo soprano, and winner of the 2012 Long Leaf Vocal Competition for young singers performs operatic songs and also songs composed by Long Leaf Co-Founder Randolph Umberger.
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

At 7:30pm, a world premiere staging of A Shipwreck Opera by New York composer John B. Hedges, with libretto by national bestseller Aimee Bender, John B. Hedges and Aimee Bender, winners of the Long Leaf New Works Competition, features Mr. Hedges as conductor who will also participate in the invitation-only Seminar for Young Composers.

This premiere work is a thought-provoking and tender look at relationships young and old, past, present and future. The opera features Tara Sperry as The Girl, washed up on the beach as a baby who grows up under a Tree which she thinks is her Mother. Shannon French plays the Tree with Maurio Hines playing the Wind who seduces The Girl. Daniel Crupi plays the Lumberjack, who also washes up on shore and chops down Tree to make a raft to leave the island with The Girl.

Immediately following the performance, audience members are invited to a complimentary champagne reception catered by Fresno Cafe in Durham and featuring a short concert of 25 Long Leaf Alums featuring excerpts from productions in which they participated during the life the company such as Kismet, Lost in the Stars, Blitztein/Weill Cabaret, Vanessa and other popular operatic song. This serenade will honor Long Leaf Opera co-founder Benjamin Keaton and the late co-founder Randolph Umberger.
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

All public events are free and open to the public. No tickets or reservations necessary. All events take place at Kenan Auditorium, Durham Academy, 3601 Ridge Road, Durham, NC.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: www.longleafopera.org or (919) 942-0972 during business hours.

About Composer John B. Hedges

Long Leaf Opera Vocal Festival

Born in 1974 in Wilmington, Delaware, Hedges studied classical music at the University of Pennsylvania, receiving his B.A. in Music in and a M.M. from Westminster Choir College with post-graduate studies at the Curtis Institute of Music where he studied with Richard Danielpour and Ned Rorem. Hedges attended the Aspen Music Festival where he studied with John Harbison and George Tsontakis and attended the Contemporary Composition and Performance course at the Britten-Pears School (as both composer and conductor). He returned to the U.K. to apprentice with Oliver Knussen. He has participated in the Academie Musicale de Villecroze in France, the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra's Composition and Conducting Institute and assisted composer Tan Dun on the Metropolitan Opera premiere of The First Emperor.

John B. Hedges' music has been performed throughout the U.S. as well as Canada, France and England. As a composer and conductor he has worked with the Ensemble Modern, New Jersey Symphony, Shanghai Symphony, Curtis Symphony Orchestra and Chamber Ensembles and the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble among others. He has conducted at the Centre Georges Pompidou, Frankfurt Alte Oper, Academie Musicale de Villecroze and the Aldeburgh Festival. Recently, Hedges completed A Shipwreck Opera in collaboration with fiction writer Aimee Bender, On the Good Foot, a James Brown tribute piece for the Albany Symphony's Dogs of Desire, and a sonatina for clarinetist Jose Franch-Ballester. In 2008, the Grand Rapids Symphony premiered Prayers of Rain and Wind with contrabass soloist Joseph Conyers for whom it was written. He has also served as orchestral arranger for the eclectic string trio Time for Three and was the Fort Worth Symphony's composer in residence for their 2011-12 season.

John B. Hedges has received the Alfred Casselo Award, the Theodore Presser Career Grant and a 2006 Independence Foundation Fellowship. He has also received grants and fellowships from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, Meet the Composer and multiple residencies at Yaddo. Hedges is currently on faculty at SUNY New Paltz.





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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Suzanne Rousso, Artistic Director
office: 919/560-2701 | cell: 919/413-3120 | suzanne@mallarmemusic.org
www.mallarmemusic.org

MALLARMÉ CHAMBER PLAYERS TEAMS UP WITH THE GREENSBORO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA TO CELBRATE RICHARD WAGNER’S 200TH BIRTHDAY

Durham, NC – Mallarmé and the Greensboro Symphony Chamber Players will present a concert program of music by three German composers, including Richard Wagner, whose 200th birthday is being celebrated this year.

The Mallarmé Chamber Players, in collaboration with the Greensboro Symphony and music director/violinist Dmitry Sitkovetsky, will present two concerts: Friday, March 1, at 8:00 pm at the UNC-G School of Music Recital Hall in Greensboro and Sunday, March 3, at 7:30 pm at Kirby Horton Hall at the Sarah P. Duke Gardens in Durham.

The program will feature what is Wagner’s only piece of chamber music, the beautiful Siegfried Idyll for 13 players. The composer wrote this piece as a birthday present for his second wife, Cosima, after the birth of their son Siegfried in 1869. The program will also include the Nonet by Louis Spohr and a light-hearted arrangement of Richard Strauss’s tone poem Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Prank. This chamber work is called Till Eulenspeigel einmal anders! (literally “Till Eulenspiegel another way”) is arranged for violin, double bass, clarinet, horn and bassoon by Franz Hasenöhrl.

Greensboro Symphony music director Dmitry Sitkovetsky will conduct the Wagner and play violin in the Strauss work. Mr. Sitkovetsky has built up an active and successful career as a violinist, conductor, arranger, chamber musician and festival director. He has performed as a violin soloist with a number of the world’s leading orchestras including the Berlin, New York and LA Philharmonic Orchestras, the Leipzig Gewandhaus, the Concertgebouw Orchestra, all of the major London orchestras and the Chicago, Philadelphia and Cleveland orchestras.

A combination of musicians from the Greensboro Symphony and the Mallarmé Chamber Players will complete the concert roster, including the GSO’s guest artist for the week, young virtuoso violinist Stefani Collins.

ARTISTS

Stefani Collins, Emi Hildebrandt* and Dmitry Sitkovetsky - violin Suzanne Rousso* – viola, Nathan Leyland* – cello, John Spuller - bass Debra Reuter-Pivetta – flute, Ashley Barret - oboe Kelly Burke and Jimmy Gilmore* - clarinet Rachael Elliott* - bassoon Robert Campbell and Andrew McAfee* - horn Anita Cirba – trumpet *denotes Mallarmé Chamber Player musician

CONCERTS

Friday, March 1, 2013, 8:00 pm, Recital Hall, UNC-G School of Music, Greensboro Tickets: $30/$5 for students with ID www.greensborosymphony.org Sunday, March 3, 2013, 7:30 pm, Kirby Horton Hall, Sarah P. Duke Gardens, Durham Tickets: $18 in advance/$20 at the door/$5 for students with ID www.mallarmemusic.org

PROGRAM

Richard Wagner – Siegfried Idyll Louis Spohr – Nonet in F major, Op. 31 Richard Strauss (arr. Hasenöhrl) – Till Eulenspiegel einmal anders! Ticket info, artist bios and programs may be found at www.mallarmemusic.org

ABOUT THE ENSEMBLES

The Greensboro Symphony Orchestra (GSO) extends back to the 1920s when a group of musicians at Woman’s College (now UNC-G) banded together under the direction of Henry Fuchs. The GSO is now a thriving regional orchestra with a budget of $1.4 million and over 60 contracted musicians. The ensemble has been led since 2003 by renowned violinist and conductor Dmitry Sitkovetsky who serves as their seventh music director. More than 50,000 Triad residents annually attend the Greensboro Symphony's offerings, which include the Masterworks Series, the Chamber Series, the POPS Series and the Holiday Concerts. The GSO’s annual educational programs serve more than 50,000 students in five counties. In its 40th season, the Greensboro Symphony Youth Orchestras comprise six ensembles of the area’s most talented young musicians. Adult Education Programs include Music at Midday, a music appreciation series held in area retirement communities; Concert Preludes, pre-concert lectures by guest speakers, open to all classical concertgoers and Postludes, an after-concert conversation with the Music Director and guest artists. www.greensborosymphony.org

The Mallarmé Chamber Players are a flexible ensemble of professional musicians based in Durham, North Carolina, whose mission is to enrich the lives of their community through outstanding chamber music. The ensemble distinguishes itself by its innovative educational programs, its commitment to creative collaboration with other organizations, its creation of significant new work and its dedication to serve a diverse population.

Mallarmé is a nonprofit, tax-exempt, 501(c)3 organization; Suzanne Rousso is the ensemble’s artistic director. The 2012-13 concert season is made possible in part by grants from the Durham Arts Council’s Annual Fund, The North Carolina Arts Council, The National Endowment for the Arts and the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation. www.mallarmemusic.org





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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MALLARMÉ CHAMBER PLAYERS RECEIVE AN NEA FASTTRACK GRANT TO SUPPORT THE NORTH CAROLINA H.I.P. MUSIC FESTIVAL

H.I.P. = HISTORICALLY INFORMED PERFORMANCE
www.mallarmemusic.org
CONTACT: Suzanne Rousso, Artistic Director
office: 919/560-2701 | cell: 919/413-3120 | suzanne@mallarmemusic.org

Durham, NC - National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Chairman Rocco Landesman announced today that the Mallarmé Chamber Players is one of 153 not-for-profit organizations nationwide to receive an NEA Challenge America FastTrack grant. The Mallarmé Chamber Players is recommended for a $10,000 grant to support the North Carolina HIP Music Festival, scheduled to take place from January 27, 2013 - February 3, 2013.

The Mallarmé Chamber Players, in collaboration with four other organizations and two university music departments, are teaming up to present a week-long festival of music performed on period instruments. The newly organized festival, the North Carolina H.I.P. Music Festival (H.I.P. = historically informed performance), will run from January 27, 2013, through February 3, 2013, and will feature performances and workshops by Aliénor (Durham), Baroque and Beyond (Chapel Hill), Ensemble Vermillian (Davidson and Berkeley, CA), Mallarmé Chamber Players (Durham), the Vivaldi Project (Washington, DC) and the music departments of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University. All events will take place at various venues in Chapel Hill and Durham.

To help support the festival, Mallarmé is receiving a Challenge America Fast-Track grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, which offers support primarily to small and mid-sized organizations for projects that extend the reach of the arts to underserved populations -- those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics or disability. Projects include commissions, residencies, rehearsals, workshops, performances, exhibitions, publications, festivals and training programs. This year, the NEA will award 153 Challenge America Fast-Track grants totaling $1.53 million awarded to organizations in 41 states. Grants from the National Endowment for the Arts generate, on average, eight dollars from non-federal sources for each dollar awarded. Additional support of the festival has been made available by Lex and Kathy Silbiger of Durham.

WHAT IS THE PURPOSE AND HISTORY OF THE NORTH CAROLINA H.I.P. MUSIC FESTIVAL?

North Carolina is fortunate to be home to a wealth of talent of musicians who perform on period instruments. After several years of successful Historical Bach concerts, Mallarmé’s artistic director, Suzanne Rousso, starting talking to some of the musicians who performed in these concerts. The group, cellists Brent Wissick, Stephanie Vial and Barbara Krumdieck and harpsichordists Elaine Funaro and Beverly Biggs, hoped to develop a festival of music on period instruments with historically informed practices. With great enthusiasm the North Carolina H.I.P. Music Festival was born! Mallarmé has taken the lead on this project, soliciting support and input from the other participating groups. Each ensemble is producing their own events independent of the others and taking on most of the Mallarmé Chamber Players associated expenses. However, we are collectively marketing and promoting the events as well as coproducing the educational activities.

OUR COLLECTIVE DESIRED OUTCOMES ARE THREE-FOLD:

  • To collaborate with like-minded organizations to bring together our respective audiences while increasing awareness, interest and support for early music in the Triangle.
  • To offer a unique musical experience to audiences by presenting a series of dynamic, historically informed performances at a high artistic level.
  • To strengthen our relationships with schools and the community by offering memorable learning opportunities that blend music and history.

Over the course of the week, five concerts, two workshops, a master class an, informance and in-school events will be presented. Some of these events are free and open to the public and some have a single ticket admission price. However, anyone may opt to purchase a HIPSTER pass for $50, which allows admission to all performances, the master class, as an auditor at the workshops and special invitation to a HIPSTER reception and open rehearsal. Additionally, the NEA grant will allow the festival to give presentations in several Durham and Chapel Hill Schools and throughout the community, including a workshop at the Durham School for the Arts and a master class at UNC-CH with countertenor Michael Maniaci.

Twenty-three total musicians will be participating in activities including a concert by members of the UNC-CH faculty performing French baroque music “discovered” by Henri and Robert Casadesus in the early 20th century (in actuality, the works were written by them), a concert presented by Aliénor of contemporary and early harpsichord music and a performance by Ensemble Vermillian of German and Italian baroque music. The Vivaldi Project will present two performance workshops modeled on their successful Institute for Early Music on Modern Instruments held each summer in Washington, DC. The workshops are for modern string players interested in learning authentic, baroque playing techniques; one will be given for string teachers and another for professional players.

Countertenor Michael Maniaci will be featured as a guest artist on the January 27th Baroque and Beyond concert, the opening event of the festival. Ever since his 2007 Metropolitan Opera debut in Handel’s Giulio Cesare, Mr. Maniaci has been in high demand as one of the foremost countertenors in baroque opera. In addition to the concert performance, Mr. Maniaci will give a master class for vocal students at UNC-CH while he is in the area. Finally, the Mallarmé Chamber Players will present the closing concert of the festival with great German baroque string works including J.S. Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 and the Telemann Concerto for recorder and viola da gamba featuring Ensemble Vermillian’s France Blaker on the recorder and UNC’s Brent Wissick on gamba.

Individual tickets for individual events will be available at the door; in addition, tickets for the February 3rd Mallarmé concert can be purchased in advance through their website www.mallarmemusic.org or by calling 919/560-2788. Those who are interested in obtaining a HIPSTER pass to all events including the Maniaci master class, workshops and reception may do so through the Mallarmé website or any of the individual ensembles’ websites. Registration and additional information for either of the workshops can be found online at http://goo.gl/Jg22I.

Sunday, January 27, 2013 – February 3, 2013 |The North Carolina H.I.P. Music Festival
Various Locations in Chapel Hill and Durham, NC

ARTISTS

Vocalists – Michael Maniaci, countertenor and Jeanne Fischer, soprano
Baroque violin – Elizabeth Field, Peter Lekx, Richard Luby, Sangeeta Swamy, David WilsonMallarmé Chamber Players
November 16, 2012

Baroque viola – Peter Lekx, Joey O’Donnell, Suzanne Rousso
Baroque cello – Barbara Krumdieck, Stephanie Vial, Brent Wissick
Viola d’amore – Hugh Partridge
Viola da gamba – Brent Wissick
Violone – Robbie Link
Harpsichord – Beverly Biggs, Elaine Funaro, John O’Brien
Piano – Randall Love
Recorder – Frances Blaker
Theorbo/lute/guitar – William Simms, Dan Smith

North Carolina HIP Music Festival Schedule of Events (does not include in-school events)

  • Sunday, January 27, 2012 3:00 pm Chapel of the Cross, Chapel Hill | CONCERT – Baroque and Beyond Italian and German baroque music | single tickets: $20
  • Monday, January 28, 4:00 pm Person Hall, UNC-CH | MASTER CLASS – Michael Maniaci, countertenor HIPSTER event
  • Tuesday, January 29, 8:00 pm Nelson Music Room, Duke East Campus, Durham | CONCERT – Aliénor music of Poulenc, winners of the 2012 Aliénor composition contest played on harpsichord and piano | FREE
  • Thursday, January 31, 7:30pm Person Recital Hall, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill | CONCERT – UNC Music Faculty French Baroque, Both Old and New | FREE
  • Friday, February 1, 12:00 noon Beyu Caffe | LISTENING LUNCH – Mallarmé Chamber Players FREE with purchase of food or drink
  • Friday, February 1, 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Person Hall, UNC-CH | WORKSHOP – The Vivaldi Project Introduction to Baroque Performance Practice for string teachers $40 participant / FREE for HIPSTER
  • Friday, February 1, 8:00 pm St. Stephens Church, Durham | CONCERT – Ensemble Vermillian Musica Transalpina, works by favorite German and Italian composers of the Baroque Era, including Bach, Buxtehude, Caccini, Castello and Fontana | suggested donation at the door: $15
  • Saturday, February 2, 10:00 am – 12:00 noon Hill Hall – UNC-CH | WORKSHOP – The Vivaldi Project Introduction to Baroque Performance Practice for professional and advanced student $40 participant / $15 auditor / FREE audit for HIPSTER
  • Saturday, February 2, 2:00 pm – 6:00 pm First Presbyterian Church, Durham | OPEN REHEARSAL Mallarmé Chamber Players | HIPSTER event
  • Saturday, February 2, 7:30 pm Home of Elaine Funaro and Randall Love | RECEPTION HIPSTER event
  • Sunday, February 3, 3:00 pm First Presbyterian Church, Durham | CONCERT – Mallarmé Chamber Players Bach Is Back, with friends! J.S. Bach, Georg Muffat, G. F. Telemann and Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber $18 in advance / $20 at the door / $5 for students with ID Ticket info, artist bios and programs may be found at www.mallarmemusic.org




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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Parker

October 19, 2012
919 747-8452

CAROLINA BALLET TO CELEBRATE THE HOLIDAY SEASON WITH THE MAGIC OF NUTCRACKER

RALEIGH, NC --- With the success of Carolina Ballet’s “new” Nutcracker last season, artistic director Robert Weiss decided to expand the run of the annual holiday favorite for the company’s 15th anniversary season to include Thanksgiving weekend 2012. “Many families come into town for Thanksgiving,” says Weiss, “so we wanted to be sure they had a chance to see our new show if they weren’t going to get back for Christmas.” Carolina Ballet will present Nutcracker, accompanied by live orchestra for all performances, at Raleigh Memorial Auditorium (RMA), November 23-25 and December 14-23; and at DPAC, in Durham, December 29 & 30. The schedule of performances is:

At RMA
Friday, Saturday & Sunday, November 23-25, 2012 at 2pm each day
Friday, December 14 at 7:30pm
Saturday, December 15, at 2 & 7:30pm
Sunday, December 16, at 12:30 & 4:30pm
Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday, December 18-20 at 7:30pm each day
Friday & Saturday, December 21 & 22, at 2 & 7:30pm both days
Sunday, December 23, at 2pm

At DPAC
Saturday, December 29 at 7pm
Sunday, December 30 at 2pm

After ten successful seasons of presenting nearly 200 performances of Carolina Ballet’s traditional Nutcracker, artistic director Robert Weiss decided in 2011 to make some changes to the annual holiday program with new scenery, designed by Jeff A.R. Jones; and grand illusions for the Party Scene of Act I. Weiss approached several magicians with his idea, but it wasn’t until he came upon Rick Thomas, one of the top magicians working in Las Vegas, that he found what he was looking for - someone who would offer the “wow factor” without taking anything away from the elegance of the Victorian Christmas Eve scene. Not only had Rick Thomas been in the magic business with nightly shows in Las Vegas for twenty-plus years, but he and his sister had been junior ballroom dancing champions, giving him a true appreciation of music and dance. Weiss said “he understood the music and the music is very important, we just couldn’t stop the show and put the tricks in.” Rick Thomas was clear from the outset that he was not going to create a magic show, saying “we designed this where the magic was woven into the story rather than it being a magic show…I think we nailed it.” The critics thought so too saying “the gasps after each eye-popping illusion, the applause for the handsome new sets and the rapt attention from all the children confirmed the changes were worth it.” (News & Observer)

The Party Scene in Act I of Nutcracker centers around the mysterious Herr Drosselmeyer, a toymaker and godfather to the Stahlbaum’s daughter, Clara. He arrives at the party with his nephew and proceeds to entertain the guests with wonderful illusions – grand scale magic, replacing the standard parlor tricks – culminating with a special guest appearing out of a giant book to give Clara the Nutcracker doll Drosselmeyer has made for her. What most people don’t realize is that Tchaikovsky wrote the magic sections into the original score, therefore adding “real” magic wasn’t changing anything it was just enhancing what was already there. The magic during the Party Scene isn’t the only magic going on in Nutcracker. There is plenty of magic behind the scenes getting the show ready. It all starts in early September when more than two hundred children line up around the building of Carolina Ballet’s studios to get their chance to audition for a role in Nutcracker. There are 67 roles for children in a cast which includes the Party children, Truffles, Soldiers, Mice, Gingerbread Cookies, Arabian attendants, and of course Clara and her little brother, Fritz. Rehearsals begin right after the auditions with Lori Christman Bourtasenkov working her own magic throughout the fall to get the 130-plus children ready for the stage. “Being in Nutcracker was a dream come true for me when I was a little boy,” says Robert Weiss. “These children work hard and by the time we get to the stage they are really good. They know their counts and their spots. It isn’t easy but they do a terrific job.” The professional dancers of Carolina Ballet are the glitz and the glamour but the children are an integral part. Without them, there would be no Nutcracker.

Ticket prices for Nutcracker range from $20-80 and may be purchased by calling the Carolina Box Office at 919 719-0900; through Ticketmaster at 800 982-2787; or at Carolina Ballet’s website - www.carolinaballet.com.





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